Posts tagged "Travel"

WSP NOLA 10-28-01 Sandbox

NOLA 10-28-01 Sandbox

Duration : 0:7:25

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House of Shock Travel Channel’s Halloween’s Most Extreme

New Orleans Halloween

The most extreme event in the country according to the Travel Channel, The House of Shock. New Orleans Halloween is an interesting event. New Orleans Halloween has taken on a life of its own. New Orleans Halloween is nearing Mardi Gras in participation.

Duration : 0:5:35

New Orleans Halloween

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New Orleans, Louisiana by Erik Hastings

New Orleans

New Orleans

New Orleans

Travel Show Live Host Erik Hastings tours New Orleans, Louisiana, one of America’s most sensual destinations, rich with history, culture, architecture, cuisine, music, and 24-hour entertainment. The French Quarter, Arts District, Garden District, Riverfront, and Downtown, are open for business and going strong with great attractions and values for visitors.

 

New Orleans The Crescent City

 

The history of New Orleans, Louisiana traces the city’s development from its founding by the French, through its period under Spanish control, then back to French rule before being sold to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. It has been one of the most important cities in the South for most of its history.

All cities’ destinies are largely determined by geography and geology, but New Orleans’ more so than most. It would, in fact, be impossible to understand the history and economic development of New Orleans without some knowledge of its unique situation and site. For, New Orleans’ economic fate–indeed, its raison d’etre–as well as the pattern of its internal physical growth have been shaped by the Mississippi River. From its beginnings, New Orleans has been a city wed to river and ocean; an almost natural dock for the transshipment of goods.

Pierce Lewis, perhaps its most knowledgeable scholar, describes New Orleans as the “inevitable city on an impossible site.” His reasons for saying so were as obvious to early explorers as to modern geographers and geologists. A glance at the map of North America reveals that the continent’s interior is drained by a single river system–the Mississippi. From the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, from the Rockies to the Appalachians, the Mississippi with its vast network of tributaries, particularly the Ohio and Missouri Rivers, provides a natural waterway system for moving people and goods across the midcontinent of North America and down the Mississippi to its outlet on the Gulf.

Another glance at the North American map reveals that there should be a city at the mouth of so splendid a transportation system. Any city so strategically situated could control the trade between the vast interior of North America and the rest of the world; and a city in so strange a situation might even determine the political future of North America. These facts were as obvious to seventeenth century French explorers as they were to Thomas Jefferson, who said of New Orleans: “There is one spot on the globe, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy. It is New Orleans.”

The French had established themselves in the norther part of North America (Canada) in the mid-seventeenth century by securing control of the St. Lawrence and the Great Lakes. Paris sought to limit the English to the eastern coast of the continent by claiming the Mississippi and its tributaries, thereby gaining control of the interior of North America. The key to securing the Mississippi was to control access to its mouth on the Gulf of Mexico, but the French explorers discovered there was a problem. From the mouth of the Mississippi to a point about 200 miles upstream (Baton Rouge), there was no ground high enough to provide a natural site for a city. While the great river demanded a splendid port city, it seemed to provide no place for one.

 

N E W  O R L E A N S

New Orleans is a city in southern Louisiana, located on the Mississippi River. Most of the city is situated on the east bank, between the river and Lake Pontchartrain to the north. Because it was built on a great turn of the river, it is known as the Crescent City. New Orleans, with a population of 496,938 (1990 census), is the largest city in Louisiana and one of the principal cities of the South. It was established on the high ground nearest the mouth of the Mississippi, which is 177 km (110 mi) downstream. Elevations range from 3.65 m (12 ft) above sea level to 2 m (6.5 ft) below; as a result, an ingenious system of water pumps, drainage canals, and levees has been built to protect the city from flooding. The city covers a land area of 518 sq km (200 sq mi). New Orleans experiences mild winters and hot, humid summers. Temperatures in January average 13 deg C (55 deg F), and in July they average 28 deg C (82 deg F). Annual rainfall is 1,448 mm (57 in).

C O N T E M P O R A R Y  C I T Y

The population of New Orleans, including Anglos, French, Blacks, Italians, Irish,Spanish, and Cubans, reflects its cosmopolitan past. The CAJUNS, or Acadians,are descendants of French emigres expelled from Nova Scotia (or Acadia) during the 18th century. They speak their own French dialect. The port is one of the world’s largest and ranks first in the United States in tonnage handled. Major exports are petroleum products, grain, cotton, paper, machinery, and iron and steel. The city’s economy is dominated by the petrochemical, aluminum, and foodprocessing industries and by tourism.

The most important annual tourist event is MARDI GRAS, which is celebrated for a week before the start of Lent. The Superdome, an enclosed sports stadium, attracts major sporting events and is an element in achieving the city’s position as a leading convention center. One of the legacies of the six-month-long 1984 World’s Fair, held in New Orleans, is a new convention center. New Orleans is noted for its fine restaurants, for its Dixieland jazz, and for its numerous cultural and educational facilities. TULANE (1829), Dillard (1869), and Loyola(1849) universities are major institutions of higher learning. The French Quarter, or Vieux Carre (French for “old square”), is the site of the original city and contains many of the historic and architecturally significant buildings for which New Orleans is famous.

H I S T O R Y

New Orleans was founded in 1718 by Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, sieur de Bienville, and named for the regent of France, Philippe II, duc d’Orleans. It remained a French colony until 1763, when it was transferred to the Spanish. In 1800, Spain ceded it back to France; in 1803, New Orleans, along with the entire Louisiana Purchase, was sold by Napoleon I to the United States. It was the site of the Battle of New Orleans (1815) in the War of 1812. During the Civil War the city was besieged by Union ships under Adm. David Farragut; it fell on Apr. 25, 1862.

 

Duration : 0:4:1

 

New Orleans

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SECRET NEW ORLEANS: TJ & Di w/Miss Marion Colbert of Tremé!

VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL! (series) episode #2! TJ Fisher and Di Harris adventures! Miss Marion demonstrates her New Orleanian attitude and bounce-back approach to life to TJ and Di: Shake the devil off your back! The secret wisdom for proper second-lining, survival, happiness in the moment and longevity. Miss Marion is a lifelong parishioner of St. Augustine Catholic Church, the oldest African-American Catholic parish in the country, the cornerstone of the city’s jazz music and second-line parade traditions. Miss Marion’s church has historical connections to nearby Congo Square.

At age 82, Creole lady Miss Marion remains the spirited queen of Jazz Funeral second lining, rejoicing and dancing back from the grave. Her effervescent spirit and magic were captured on film Easter Sunday — during her regular work day, with a little dancing weaved in amid her normal-routine duties and responsibilities.This clip was filmed onsite in the ladies’ restroom of the elegant and famed French Quarter Brennan’s Restaurant. (Audible toilets flush in the background.) Miss Marion has served as the establishment’s beloved washroom attendant for four decades, and she walks to work from her historical Tremé neighborhood.

Miss Marion is a living example of New Orleans ability to recover post-disaster, to triumph over sorrow, through a belief in, and a living testament, to the power of faith, hope, prayer, worship, music, dance, courage, collective memory, history, cultural identify, local customs and religious heritage.

Miss Marion says, “What’s life? Life is what you make it. A smile goes a long way.”

Miss Marion poignantly and proudly reveals her wisdom — the counsel of Father Jerome LeDoux, a beloved Afro-American priest — in post-Katrina New Orleans. During storm, Miss Marion lost her home and stayed with the masses at the New Orleans Saints Louisiana Superdome; post-Katrina her beloved grandsons Damon Brooks, 16, and Ivan Brooks, 17, were murdered in 2007 the 9th Ward. Her story was profiled in The New Yorker (New Orleans Journal) and elsewhere.
http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/neworleansjournal/2007/02/
http://blog.nola.com/tpcrimearchive/2007/03/a_communitys_loss.html.
Despite breathtaking losses, Miss Marion perseveres and enjoys life, with a smile, joy and celebration, as she continues to take her own advice.

Miss Marion played herself in the Peter Entell documentary, Shake the Devil Off.
http://jsr.fsu.edu/Katrina/Johnson.htm

Miss Marion dances on video with VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL! (series) mischief-making provocateurs TJ Fisher and Di Harris!

Quirky French Quarter author/Bourbon Street resident TJ Fisher and style maven/artist Di Harris carve a unique niché among New Orleans eccentric notables and flamboyant characters. TJ previous dedicated an original New Orleans-based 2008 nonfiction book to Miss Marion.

TJ and Di are known for their offbeat sense of satire and signature panache — adventuresome hijinks, biting wit, high-octane passion and theatrical style. TJ drives a ’59 pink Caddy convertible named Lulabell, and Di rides a 1968 “My Fair Lady” model banana-seat Stingray. TJ is the accolade-winning author of multiple works of New Orleans-based nonfiction and fiction. Award-winning designer Di is the proprietor of where the stars shop, Zogwald’s of the French Quarter, an ever popular and famed international boutique. (TJ also maintains a home in Palm Beach, Florida and Di in Melbourne, Australia.)

See outrageous Sandcastle Queen TJ Fisher and her idiosyncratic friend and partner in shenanigans Lady Marigny Di Harris in additional Tanzmanianmudbug YouTube postings: http://www.youtube.com/user/Tanzmanianmudbug.

See more about TJ at:
http://www.tjfisher.com
http://www.tjfisher.net

The vintage-style clip of Miss Marion (an afternoon in the life of TJ and Di, and their intriguingly surreal real world) ends with unforgettable imagery of Miss Marion in motion. Miss Marion regularly doles out her inspirational secrets of life and pearls of wisdom to, and is beloved by, an endless parade of superstars, luminaries, VIPs, ladies of society, the wealthy and the not-so-wealthy, common folks.

The duality of New Orleans and French Quarter life seems extreme. Here the unlikely happens frequently; ironic situations and chance meetings are an everyday occurrence. In New Orleans, history is not merely something observed from afar by leafing through the pages of textbooks. The rich cultural heritage of the city’s forebears still shapes, pervades and surrounds daily life. Here the band plays on, and life goes on. Joie de vivre.

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HBO and David Simon’s lush new drama series Treme “gets” New Orleans, they definitely get it, do you? Do you get the resilient heart, soul, spirit and humor of the people and places of New Orleans…?

DO YOU KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO MISS NEW ORLEANS?

Duration : 0:2:14

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Is it safe to travel to new orleans for mardi gras next year?

I am planning a trip next year for Mardi Gras, but I have heard that New Orleans is still a very dangerous place for tourists. Would anyone who lives there or has been there recently confirm this? We are planning to go as a group and will probably rent a pair of SUV’s for the trip. I am concerned that the trucks may make us targets for being robbed.

Oh My God. Do you think that no one else in New Orleans drives an SUV. I will admit that New Orleans has it’s problems, but if you plan on coming to the city for Mardi Gras, just be a smart traveler. Do as you would in any big city. Be aware of your surroundings, make reservations in an area that is safe, try to stay in the vicinity of the festivities, so that you don’t have to drive around a lot. I am going to assume that you are going to frequent Bourbon Street. You can get hotels in the French Quarter, within walking distance of everything. Do your research. Do not wait too long to make your reservations, they will be booked up soon.

If you are still very concerned my suggestion is to make sure you have insurance on the SUV’s, or, choose another destination for your vacation.

And, just FYI… I work in the heart and center of the Central Business District, 5 blocks from Bourbon Street, and I drive an SUV to work every day… a big red on at that, and have been for the past 5 years, and have never been robbed.


::Exclusive Video:: Forever New Orleans

Amazing jazz performance from New Orleans, check it out.
Check out more at http://www.foreverneworleans.com/24

Duration : 0:2:41

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SECRET NEW ORLEANS: TJ & Di Théâtre d’Orléans! Voodoo Vapors!

VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL! (series) episode #13! TJ Fisher and Di Harris adventures! The Hoo-hah Ladies of the French Quarter live life out loud! In this retro-style film clip — the funky, fun, chic and slightly mad fashionistas open up their world and take you with them! To unexpected places and French Quarter haunts! Tag along with the mad hattresses, and enjoy an armchair Voodoo-trance “window shopping” spell and spree on Royal Street, and beyond! Snippets of French Quarter life!

Well seasoned by an intriguing life stories that resemble weird Hollywood sagas flavored by sensational speculation, TJ and Di remain full of humor and fanciful visions. They are fearless wunderkind prone to incite, without compunction, a firestorm of controversy in their wake. The zany duo enjoy poking fun at themselves, as well as Hollywood “It” girls, rock star royalty, high society butterflies and Hollywood elite. Glitterati, literati, pundits and paparazzi are all fair game for VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL!

In an intoxicating old town that truly embraces the individual, these two one-of-a-kind women — similar to other colorful local fixtures — start trends instead of following them. First jokester TJ hunts for her koo-koo tweety bird, who is roosted atop her head. Playfully poised in front of the storefront window display of Di’s French Quarter international boutique, TJ gets the lowdown on tastemaker retailing. Zogwald’s features hip-glamour clothing and timeless collectibles. Next Di is seen shopping at the famed and gritty Bourbon Street Quartermaster Deli, a storied 24-hour grocery store of comfort food and colorful characters. The double-trouble pair of wild and whacky divas window-shop at Fleur De Paris couture millinery shop. Girly-girl, romantic and sophisticated hats! Chapeaus! Couture! Last the two appear in a quick-snapshot montage of French Quarter destinations, in a town uniquely well suited to a rolling parade of music stars, Mardi Gras queens, pretty princesses, glamour girls, big-eyed tourists and troublemakers.

Old world crawfish boils, bands, music, mystery, madness, hatboxes, vapors, steeples, spires, splendor — the New Orleans way! The Who Dat attitude!

See kicky-cool Swamp Empress TJ Fisher and Peacock Princess Di Harris, in additional Tanzmanianmudbug YouTube postings:
http://www.youtube.com/user/Tanzmanianmudbug

Always at the cornerstone of eccentric behavior, TJ drives a ’59 pink Cadillac convertible named Lulabell, and Di rides a 1968 “My Fair Lady” model banana-seat Stingray. TJ Fisher is the accolade-winning author of multiple works of New Orleans-based nonfiction and fiction. Award-winning designer Di Harris is the fashion maven and vintage vamp pinup artist behind the trademark “Oonkas Boonkas” style chic. (TJ also maintains a home in Palm Beach, Florida and Di in Melbourne, Australia.)
Read more about TJ at:
?http://www.tjfisher.com
?http://www.tjfisher.net

In New Orleans town, the time-honored circle of rosary beads, revelry and rue come together. Intriguing tales of unconventionalities abound. A wildly personal place, customs, sacraments and superstitions do not fit easily into any one category. That is what makes New Orleans particularly interesting, entertaining, amusing and controversial. It is a community of rich ethnicities, religions, opinions. The ancient city is a unique place of worship and frolic, introspection and self-discovery — for the holy and hedonistic alike. New Orleanians are mainly spiritual and yet separate and aloof, sometimes religious and sometimes not, deeply influenced by our existence and death on the edge. Known to be unorthodox, ideological, cryptic and philosophical, the people of New Orleans often take what they want from Catholicism, Baptism, Judaism and Voodooism — forming new conjunctions with their own cherished traditions. The truth is that the Crescent City takes in life with a different set of eyes, with an open and caring “anything-goes” attitude. Le Bon Temps Roule. Some call the locals idiosyncratic and iconoclastic, and it is true. Passions run rampant. Emotions are poured, provoked and stirred. Senses ignited. The spirit and soul of the city — the unique history, culture and customs — reign supreme.

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HBO and David Simon’s lush new drama series Treme “gets” New Orleans; they definitely get it, do you? Do you get the resilient heart, soul, spirit and humor of the people and places of New Orleans…?

DO YOU KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO MISS NEW ORLEANS?

Duration : 0:4:53

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Travel to New Orleans

You know about Mardi Gras, the French Quarter and Bourbon Street, but there’s so much more to learn. Find out more about life with http://www.WatchMojo.com in the Big Easy: New Orleans.

Duration : 0:1:1

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Where can I mail something from in the French Quarter?

I need to have some pieces of mail sent out from New Orleans while I’m in the French Quarter. Does anyone know if there’s a USPS mail drop box inside the French Quarter or close to it?

The Loyola St. station is a good bet. If you’re staying at a hotel, check w/ the consierge. They may just send out your mail with theirs. There is a ‘postal’ store on the corner of Bourbon & either Dumaine or St. Philip. I went there back in ’08 when I was staying in NOLA. Good luck!


Lookin'@Louisville – Exploring Bourbon Country Part 1 – Episode 17

In this episode we take you on a Bourbon Country adventure departing from Louisville on the Mint Julep Tour bus to the central Bardstown region of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. We visit Jim Beam, Heaven Hill, Tom Moore and Maker's Mark distilleries. Dining at Kurtz's Restaurant.

Duration : 9 min 57 sec

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