Posts tagged "Travel"

New Orleans Blues Guitar Slim Jr. Sweet Home New Orleans R&B Series

Guitar Slim, Jr., the son of New Orleans blues legend, Guitar Slim, has made a name for himself beyond his famous father’s legacy. His first album, “The Story of My Life” earned Guitar Slim, Jr. a Grammy award nomination. A talented guitarist in his own right, Guitar Slim, Jr., aka Rodney Armstrong carries on his father’s legacy as a blues guitar virtuoso and a masterful entertainer.

The original Guitar Slim was an early blues guitar sensation, both electrifying musician and entertaining performer. He is considered, along with B.B King and Buddy Guy to be one of the original blues greats. Unfortunately, the hard living of a blues musician took Guitar Slim too soon. He died in 1959 at the age of 34. Thankfully, before he died he was able to impress upon his young son Rodney the spirit of his guitar mastery. Because the name “Guitar Slim” was never trademarked there are many others who have adopted the name in an attempt to associate themselves with greatness. Only one, Guitar Slim’s own son, Rodney Armstrong, has both the right and the style and technique to carry on his father’s legacy.

In this video Guitar Slim, Jr. and his band, including two other masterful blues guitarists, play “Pride & Joy,” an R&B song at Banks Street Bar in New Orleans the location of the Sweet Home New Orleans Summer R&B Series. Each Thursday night through the summer Sweet Home New Orleans presents some of New Orleans’ most talented R&B and blues musicians. The Summer R&B series is one of the many programs sponsored by Sweet Home New Orleans in their “Bringing the Music Back to New Orleans” initiative.

To find out how you can help Sweet Home New Orleans preserve New Orleans’ rich musical heritage, go to SweetHomeNewOrleans.org.

This video includes three excellent blues guitar solos. Starting at the 3:00 point, all three of the band’s incredible guitarists take a turn soloing. Close ups of the guitarist’s fingers during their solos is included. Song 2 of this performance is a more traditional blues song and includes even more amazing guitar solos.

Duration : 0:6:35

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Where can I mail something from in the French Quarter?

I need to have some pieces of mail sent out from New Orleans while I’m in the French Quarter. Does anyone know if there’s a USPS mail drop box inside the French Quarter or close to it?

The Loyola St. station is a good bet. If you’re staying at a hotel, check w/ the consierge. They may just send out your mail with theirs. There is a ‘postal’ store on the corner of Bourbon & either Dumaine or St. Philip. I went there back in ’08 when I was staying in NOLA. Good luck!


Has anyone ever driven from New York to New Orleans?

We are planning a road trip to New Orleans for Mardi Gras in Feb 2010… I am looking for some information on the route down, meaning attractions, sights etc… I’ve never driven down that way before and am wondering if there is anything worth stopping for on the way down??

I have not driven between NY and NO, but have driven from New Orleans to North Carolina (most of the way). The most direct route from NY is via Harrisburg, Knoxville, and Birmingham. A more interesting route would probably be via Washington DC, Charleston, Savannah, Jacksonville, and Pensacola/Mobile – but it would also be a longer trip (though only about 250 miles more.).

All of the states and cities have tourism websites.

Realize that traffic and parking are the absolute number one problem in New Orleans during Carnival. Don’t try to park on the street – it’s a recipe for being towed away by the City. If your hotel is in the French Quarter most of the FQ becomes a pedestrian mall starting the Thursday before Mardi Gras Day. Ask your hotel how to get your car into the "no vehicles" area, and remember the nighttime crowds may be very thick.

Go to these sites for info about Carnival in New Orleans, and the FAQ sections may be very useful:

http://www.mardigras.com/

http://www.mardigrasguide.com/

Hope you have a good trip!


Book New Orleans Now, Pay Later!

http://bookit.com BookIt.com TV spot featuring discount rates in many BookIt destinations such as New York City, Mexico, Las Vegas, Florida and the Caribbean plus “No Payments for up to 6 Months” when you the BillMeLater payment option on BookIt.com.

Duration : 0:0:31

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Lookin'@Louisville – Exploring Bourbon Country Part 1 – Episode 17

In this episode we take you on a Bourbon Country adventure departing from Louisville on the Mint Julep Tour bus to the central Bardstown region of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. We visit Jim Beam, Heaven Hill, Tom Moore and Maker's Mark distilleries. Dining at Kurtz's Restaurant.

Duration : 9 min 57 sec

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New Orleans – My Journey Contest Video for Lonely Planet

Lonely Planet author Tom Downs loves New Orleans’ soulful, saucy and eccentric nature. Located as far South as geogrpahically possible in the USA, it’s only mildly American in flavour, more a gumbo of French, Carribbean and African American. Tourists might flock to Bourbon Street’s non-stop carnival but the whole city really knows how to have a great time.
Produced by Lonely Planet.
Did you enjoy this sample My Journey contest entry from Lonely Planet? Upload your own Travel Video and enter to WIN the chance to film for Lonely Planet on location in California thanks to T-Mobile myTouch 3G. Make sure your video is 3 minutes or less enter the My Journey contest at http://www.youtube.com/lonelyplanet .

Duration : 0:2:41

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Gallery

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Duration : 2 min 44 sec

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New Orleans, Louisiana by Erik Hastings

New Orleans

New Orleans

New Orleans

Travel Show Live Host Erik Hastings tours New Orleans, Louisiana, one of America’s most sensual destinations, rich with history, culture, architecture, cuisine, music, and 24-hour entertainment. The French Quarter, Arts District, Garden District, Riverfront, and Downtown, are open for business and going strong with great attractions and values for visitors.

 

New Orleans The Crescent City

 

The history of New Orleans, Louisiana traces the city’s development from its founding by the French, through its period under Spanish control, then back to French rule before being sold to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. It has been one of the most important cities in the South for most of its history.

All cities’ destinies are largely determined by geography and geology, but New Orleans’ more so than most. It would, in fact, be impossible to understand the history and economic development of New Orleans without some knowledge of its unique situation and site. For, New Orleans’ economic fate–indeed, its raison d’etre–as well as the pattern of its internal physical growth have been shaped by the Mississippi River. From its beginnings, New Orleans has been a city wed to river and ocean; an almost natural dock for the transshipment of goods.

Pierce Lewis, perhaps its most knowledgeable scholar, describes New Orleans as the “inevitable city on an impossible site.” His reasons for saying so were as obvious to early explorers as to modern geographers and geologists. A glance at the map of North America reveals that the continent’s interior is drained by a single river system–the Mississippi. From the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, from the Rockies to the Appalachians, the Mississippi with its vast network of tributaries, particularly the Ohio and Missouri Rivers, provides a natural waterway system for moving people and goods across the midcontinent of North America and down the Mississippi to its outlet on the Gulf.

Another glance at the North American map reveals that there should be a city at the mouth of so splendid a transportation system. Any city so strategically situated could control the trade between the vast interior of North America and the rest of the world; and a city in so strange a situation might even determine the political future of North America. These facts were as obvious to seventeenth century French explorers as they were to Thomas Jefferson, who said of New Orleans: “There is one spot on the globe, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy. It is New Orleans.”

The French had established themselves in the norther part of North America (Canada) in the mid-seventeenth century by securing control of the St. Lawrence and the Great Lakes. Paris sought to limit the English to the eastern coast of the continent by claiming the Mississippi and its tributaries, thereby gaining control of the interior of North America. The key to securing the Mississippi was to control access to its mouth on the Gulf of Mexico, but the French explorers discovered there was a problem. From the mouth of the Mississippi to a point about 200 miles upstream (Baton Rouge), there was no ground high enough to provide a natural site for a city. While the great river demanded a splendid port city, it seemed to provide no place for one.

 

N E W  O R L E A N S

New Orleans is a city in southern Louisiana, located on the Mississippi River. Most of the city is situated on the east bank, between the river and Lake Pontchartrain to the north. Because it was built on a great turn of the river, it is known as the Crescent City. New Orleans, with a population of 496,938 (1990 census), is the largest city in Louisiana and one of the principal cities of the South. It was established on the high ground nearest the mouth of the Mississippi, which is 177 km (110 mi) downstream. Elevations range from 3.65 m (12 ft) above sea level to 2 m (6.5 ft) below; as a result, an ingenious system of water pumps, drainage canals, and levees has been built to protect the city from flooding. The city covers a land area of 518 sq km (200 sq mi). New Orleans experiences mild winters and hot, humid summers. Temperatures in January average 13 deg C (55 deg F), and in July they average 28 deg C (82 deg F). Annual rainfall is 1,448 mm (57 in).

C O N T E M P O R A R Y  C I T Y

The population of New Orleans, including Anglos, French, Blacks, Italians, Irish,Spanish, and Cubans, reflects its cosmopolitan past. The CAJUNS, or Acadians,are descendants of French emigres expelled from Nova Scotia (or Acadia) during the 18th century. They speak their own French dialect. The port is one of the world’s largest and ranks first in the United States in tonnage handled. Major exports are petroleum products, grain, cotton, paper, machinery, and iron and steel. The city’s economy is dominated by the petrochemical, aluminum, and foodprocessing industries and by tourism.

The most important annual tourist event is MARDI GRAS, which is celebrated for a week before the start of Lent. The Superdome, an enclosed sports stadium, attracts major sporting events and is an element in achieving the city’s position as a leading convention center. One of the legacies of the six-month-long 1984 World’s Fair, held in New Orleans, is a new convention center. New Orleans is noted for its fine restaurants, for its Dixieland jazz, and for its numerous cultural and educational facilities. TULANE (1829), Dillard (1869), and Loyola(1849) universities are major institutions of higher learning. The French Quarter, or Vieux Carre (French for “old square”), is the site of the original city and contains many of the historic and architecturally significant buildings for which New Orleans is famous.

H I S T O R Y

New Orleans was founded in 1718 by Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, sieur de Bienville, and named for the regent of France, Philippe II, duc d’Orleans. It remained a French colony until 1763, when it was transferred to the Spanish. In 1800, Spain ceded it back to France; in 1803, New Orleans, along with the entire Louisiana Purchase, was sold by Napoleon I to the United States. It was the site of the Battle of New Orleans (1815) in the War of 1812. During the Civil War the city was besieged by Union ships under Adm. David Farragut; it fell on Apr. 25, 1862.

 

Duration : 0:4:1

 

New Orleans

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5 Great Things to do in New Orleans – 1/15/10

I’m Craig Guillot, your New Orleans festivals and events Insider with Tripvine. Today is Friday, January 15, 2010 and here are your 5 Great Things to do in New Orleans This Weekend. For more information, visit Tripvine.com.

Duration : 0:1:53

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I’m turning 21, and I’ll be spending it on Bourbon Street. What should I drink?

I don’t really know many drinks, usually at home I just stick to the gin&tonic, margaritas, and beer.

What drinks do you think would be best to try out for my 21st?
And are there any New Orleans specialty drinks I should try while there?

I like almost any drink, unless it tastes like straight alcohol.

have a hurricane!!!!!

hand greades are cool to but don’t have too many.

if you go to lafite’s blacksmith shop and get a purple slurpie


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