Posts tagged "NOLA"

New Orleans Louisiana Airboat Tours

http://bookit.com/us/louisiana/new-orleans/
Get ready for an exciting adventure! Take a thrilling ride through the swamps and bayous of Louisiana, accessible only by airboat. The captain, a native of the area, offers a colorful history of the Cajun way of life. You’ll come face to face with alligators, snakes and other native creatures while touring their neighborhood.
We have been offering our airboat tours since May 2000.
Seven airboats are available accommodating up to 98 passengers. Each vessel is ready to take you to the far reaches of the bayous by using Chevy 454, 450 horsepower engines.

Duration : 0:1:20

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Saints Win! Party on Bourbon Street!

Wild celebration on Bourbon Street in New Orleans following Saints victory over the Vikings in the NFC Championship game.

Duration : 0:0:43

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What’s Bourbon Street like in November?

My friends and I will be going to the Alabama/LSU game and thought we’d spend a night or two in New Orleans. I’ve been there before for Mardis Gras and I know how crazy that can be. I wanted to know what Bourbon Street is like in the off season. Should we bring beads (and yes, we know that’s touristy, but we don’t mind ;-) Is it worth it to get a hotel with a balcony overlooking Bourbon?

It won’t be as crazy as Mardi Gras (nothing is) but there should be lots of people in town for the game. The weather in November is also usually nice.

There are only two (2) hotels with balcony rooms overlooking Bourbn Street:

Royal Sonesta
Ramada Inn on Bourbon

Balcony rooms can be fun. They also tend to be noisy (from the crowd on the street all night). If sleep is important don’t get a balcony room. You don’t need beeds and it’s actually against the law to throw them from the balcony to the crowd. Yes, people do it and the police don’t interfere unless it becomes a problem. If hotel security/management or the police tell you to stop then stop.


Down Swan Song Live

Down Swan Song Live

Duration : 0:3:35

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New Orleans Louisiana Creole Cajun Zydeco Music. Blues & Jazz of Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday NOLA Saints

New Orleans (pronounced /nu???li?nz, nu???l?nz/ locally and often pronounced /nu??r?li?nz/ in most other US dialects French: La Nouvelle-Orléans is a major United States port city and the largest city in Louisiana. New Orleans is the center of the Greater New Orleans metropolitan area, the largest metro area in the state.

New Orleans is located in southeastern Louisiana, straddling the Mississippi River. It is coextensive with Orleans Parish, meaning that the boundaries of the city and the parish are the same. It is bounded by the parishes of St. Tammany (north), St. Bernard (east), Plaquemines (south), and Jefferson (south and west). Lake Pontchartrain, part of which is included in the city limits, lies to the north, and Lake Borgne lies to the east.
The city is named after Philippe II, Duc d’Orléans, Regent of France, and is one of the oldest cities in the United States. It is well known for its multicultural and multilingual heritage, cuisine, architecture, music (particularly as the birthplace of jazz), and its annual Mardi Gras and other celebrations and festivals. The city is often referred to as the “most unique” city in America

La Nouvelle-Orléans (New Orleans) was founded May 7, 1718, by the French Mississippi Company, under the direction of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville on land inhabited by the Chitimacha. It was named for Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, who was Regent of France at the time; his title came from the French city of Orléans. The French colony was ceded to the Spanish Empire in the Treaty of Paris (1763) and remained under Spanish control until 1801, when it reverted to French control. Most of the surviving architecture of the Vieux Carré (French Quarter) dates from this Spanish period. Napoleon sold the territory to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. The city grew rapidly with influxes of Americans, French, and Creole French. Major commodity crops of sugar and cotton were cultivated with slave labor on large plantations outside the city.

The Haitian Revolution of 1804 established the second republic in the Western Hemisphere and the first led by blacks. Haitian refugees both white and free people of color (affranchis) arrived in New Orleans, often bringing slaves with them. While Governor Claiborne and other officials wanted to keep out more free black men, French Creoles wanted to increase the French-speaking population. As more refugees were allowed in Louisiana, Haitian émigrés who had gone to Cuba also arrived. Nearly 90 percent of the new immigrants settled in New Orleans. The 1809 migration brought 2,731 whites; 3,102 free persons of African descent; and 3,226 enslaved refugees to the city, doubling its French-speaking population.

During the War of 1812, the British sent a force to conquer the city. The Americans decisively defeated the British troops, led by Sir Edward Pakenham, in the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815.

As a principal port, New Orleans had the major role of any city during the antebellum era in the slave trade. Its port handled huge quantities of goods for export from the interior and import from other countries to be traded up the Mississippi River. The river was filled with steamboats, flatboats, and sailing ships. At the same time, it had the most prosperous community of free persons of color in the South, who were often educated and middle-class property owners.

The population of the city doubled in the 1830s, and by 1840 New Orleans had become the wealthiest and third-most populous city in the nation. It had the largest slave market. Two-thirds of the more than one million slaves brought to the Deep South arrived via the forced migration of the internal slave trade. The money generated by sales of slaves in the Upper South has been estimated at fifteen percent of the value of the staple crop economy. The slaves represented half a billion dollars in property, and an ancillary economy grew up around the trade in slaves – for transportation, housing and clothing, fees, etc., estimated at 13.5 percent of the price per person. All this amounted to tens of billions of dollars during the antebellum period, with New Orleans as a prime beneficiary.

The Union captured New Orleans early in the American Civil War, sparing the city the destruction suffered by many other cities of the American South.

Duration : 0:3:25

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Bourbon Street Parade_Harry Connick Jr.

Bourbon Street Parade_Harry Connick Jr.

Duration : 0:6:5

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French Quarter Festival 2008

A wander around the Vieux Carre… includes popular footage of ‘old lady in pink doing her thing’ – great fun

Duration : 0:7:8

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Dan Gilbert at Bourbon Street

Dan Gilbert Brawling at Bourbon Street

Duration : 0:2:38

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SECRET NEW ORLEANS: TJ & Di Hoochie Coochie Ladies!

VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL! (series) episode #9! TJ Fisher and Di adventures! Drinks and tea with TJ and Di! Start the day with the zany duo, and enjoy a rollicking behind-the-scenes French Quarter morning! Wake up with CNN’s anchorwoman Robin Meade, but come home with TJ and Di, and live their life! So absurd, absolutely fabulous, and slightly off kilter!

The retro-style short film begins with a montage of imagery — a colorful gay parade, the Natchez steamship, Jax Brewery, the Cabildo and St. Louis Cathedral — then the camera zooms in on zany TJ and Di breakfasting in TJ’s old-timey kitchen, in a historic Vieux Carré home on Bourbon Street. TJ’s two blonde-and-blond dogs, Colonel Dudley Boudreaux Waddlesworth and Madame Calliope de Bourbon, join the Belles of Bourbon for mealtime. A dose of local-local comedy, satire and renegade behavior!

After a wakeup-call breakfast at TJ’s haunted house, the two friends check out a French Quarter adult clothing store and happen upon Marilyn Monroe (bawdy local drag queen character and showgirl Princes Stephaney); Marilyn offers up titillating tidbits of advice, along with an outburst of vivacious singing and storytelling. Afterwards TJ plays with Baby Totie, the loudmouth squealing miniature pig, deep in the heart of one of the French Quarter’s famed secret gardens. Private. Exclusive. Surreal. Insider sneak peek at life in the Quarter. From there TJ and Di move on to Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop, the oldest bar in American, then they encounter a silver-painted street performer mime. Finally the double-trouble pair wind up in front of Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville.

Jack Jones makes a cameo appearance in his boutique Alternatives.

Eccentric French Quarter author/Bourbon Street resident TJ Fisher and Boho-chic stylemaker Di Harris fit the mold for outrageous New Orleans characters. Both enjoy hare-brained escapades and loony-tunes humor.

See Sandcastle Queen TJ Fisher and her fiesty friend and comrade Lady Marigny Di Harris in additional Tanzmanianmudbug YouTube postings: http://www.youtube.com/user/Tanzmanianmudbug.

Swamp Empress TJ drives a ’59 pink Cadillac convertible named Lulabell, and Di rides a 1968 “My Fair Lady” model banana-seat Stingray. TJ is the nationally acclaimed author of multiple New Orleans-based nonfiction and fiction works. Award-wining designer/artist Di owns Zogwald’s, an eclectic French Quarter boutique, and her original pinup-girl artwork graces celebrity homes. (TJ also maintains a home in Palm Beach, Florida and Di in Melbourne, Australia.)

Learn more about TJ at:

http://www.tjfisher.com

http://www.tjfisher.net

VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL! The intersection of fact and fiction! Louisiana has a legacy of many lifetimes of passionate, flamboyant and parading women, magnificent and meaningful larger-than-life personalities, women of many mindsets, passions, nationalities and exotic traditions. Leaving an indelible mark on the world are the ladies of New Orleans: femme fatales, noblewomen, glamour girls, baronesses, placées, literary lionesses, nuns, singers, Mardi Gras maids, jazz musicians, restaurateurs, Creole belles, artists, burlesque dancers, Voodoo priestesses, entertainers, women of letters, politicians, sculptors, beauty queens, philanthropists, entrepreneurs, gens de couleur, society matriarchs, painters, shopkeepers, Storyville seductresses….??

Their stories live on, their essence lingers, their threads remain, embedded deep within the fabric of New Orleans.

The three-centuries-old French is like nowhere else in the world. Beyond the clamor and fracas of the Quarter, ancient prayers of patron saints sprout like briars of damp growth, calling forth memories. People feel a draft and thoughts of old pierce the heart. History traipses through the mind. Delicious ambrosia seems nearby, just beyond the brambles and thistles. The Vieux Carré houses the sundown and scintillation of checkered characters and centuries faintly known, misting all around. History intrudes. Filigree twists of the rise and fall of man and memories remain seamed into the bricks.

The French Quarter exudes the undertones of a tragic quality that cannot be denied; yet the hypnotic effect is otherworldly beauty, stark and startling, pure and paramount. She is a city that stirs the senses and seduces the soul, for she tampers with a person’s inclinations and toys with the mind. In New Orleans, time passes differently.

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HBO and David Simon’s lush new drama series Treme “gets” New Orleans; they definitely get it, do you? Do you get the resilient heart, soul, spirit and humor of the people and places of New Orleans…?

DO YOU KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO MISS NEW ORLEANS?

Duration : 0:5:14

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What to do in New Orleans? Metairie safe & close to French-Q?

I am going during the Essence music festival. If you are from N.O. or have visited please give me your opinion on the best resturants, ferries boats, bars, club, attractions, etc. Don’t forget a safe place to stay and parking advice thanks!

Metairie is NOT close to the French Quarte – it is a mostly middle class suburb to the west of the city. Metairie was damaged by Katrina but did not suffer the really extensive flooding that devastated New Orleans so it has almost fully recovered.

Katrina flooded about 80% of New Orleans with salt water, and the water stayed for almost a month. Much of the city is still struggling to recover and all you have to do to see devastation is drive around. It will take years for NOLA to fully recover from Katrina.

However, the parts of the city that tourists usually visit were not flooded. It’s not a coincidence – the French Quarter and other old parts of the city were built on relatively high ground and only suffered wind damage from Katrina. Almost all of the damage has been repaired and you have to look closely in the FQ or city center to see that Katrina happened at all.

If you drive or rent a car, put your car in a lot or garage and leave it there unless you are traveling away from downtown. You don’t need a car to get around in the French Quarter, Central Business District, or Warehouse District. Also, the parking regulations are Byzantine and there are lots of "parking control agents".

The regional transit authority (www.norta.com) sells 1 and 3 day passes that offer unlimited use of buses and streetcars for the day(s) you select.

There is always music, but the bands change: Go to www.bestofneworleans.com and click on Music then Listings or to www.offbeat.com and click on Listings, then Music.

Wander around the French Quarter, enjoy the architecture, watch the street entertainers (do tip), and visit some of the historic buildings that have been turned into museums. Most of them charge admission but some are free (go to www.frenchquarter.com and click on Historic Attractions).

Assuming the weather is nice, you can collect a sandwich lunch and eat in the riverfront park (watch the shipping) or in Jackson Square (a very nice park).

The Riverwalk shopping center has a food court with dining overlooking the river (www.riverwalkmarketplace.com)…

Cafe du Monde is in the French Quarter and you shouldn’t miss having cafe au lait & beignets (www.cafedumonde.com). Another great coffee shop is the Croissant d’Or (at 615 Ursulines Street), which is open from 7:00am to 2:00pm and has food other than pastry.

There is a free ferry across the Mississippi at the "foot" of Canal Street. It is a short trip but like a harbor cruise w/o a guide.

The Aquarium and Audubon Zoo are world-class attractions (www.auduboninstitute.org) and you should see them if you can. There is a shuttle boat (not free) between the Aquarium (which is next to the French Quarter) and the Zoo (which is several miles away). You can also drive to the Zoo (which has free parking) or take public transit from the French Quarter.

New Orleans is home to a number of other museums, such as the National World War II Museum (www.ddaymuseum.org) and the New Orleans Museum of Art (www.noma.org). Both can be reached by public transit: The WWII museum is in the central business district but a long walk from the French Quarter and NOMA is not within walking distance of downtown but has free parking if you choose to drive there…

Crime tends to become a topic in questions about New Orleans. Use the same common sense you need in every major city in the world and there is little chance you will be a victim of anything except a need to visit the gym: Pay attention to your surroundings. Stay away from anywhere dark & deserted. Pay attention to your feelings – if anyone or anywhere gives you a bad feeling, leave the area. Don’t leave something like a camera-bag or backpack unattended on a park bench while you wander off to take photos. Etc.

Hope you have a good visit!


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