Posts tagged "New Orleans travel"

PETE FOUNTAIN w/ Connie Jones’ French Quarter Festival All-Stars, 4/17/09

The legendary clarinetist Pete Fountain performs with cornetist Connie Jones’ French Quarter Festival All-Stars. Also, Otis Bazoon on sax, Tim Laughlin on clarinet, Rick Trolsen on trombone, David Boeddinghaus on piano, Bryan Barberot on drums. I forget the bassist’s name. Intro by Ronnie Kole. The opening tune is “Clarinet Marmalade”, with “St. Louis Blues” in the second part. What a way to kick off French Quarter Fest 2009!

Duration : 0:8:49

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Lenny Kravitz at Gallery 713

Doin’ it in New Orleans. Now on my way back to the Bahamas to finish the album. Lenny. Song: “Do It” from the forthcoming album. Also featured in the movie “Precious.” Film by Mathieu Bitton/candytangerine.com
Length:4:47
Check out this video of Lenny in the French Quarter with my pal Heidi Young and her dog Schucki.  This is not Lenny’s first visit to Gallery 713 while in New Orleans. He actually has and wears on stage one of Dana Tharp’s badass voodoo doll t-shirts.   Told y’all this place ROCKS!!  On your next NOLA visit make sure to visit Gallery 713.  On top of the super cool art available there, there is just no telling who you will run into.  I love this place!!
by Sharon Denise Talbot

What hotels on Bourbon Street in New Orleans have rooms with balconies overlooking Bourbon?


The Inn on Bourbon, Bourbon Orleans and Royal Sonesta are the only balconies overlooking bouron street.

The Chateau Sonesta and Astor Crowne Plaza MAY have a room or two with balconies overlooking the 100 block of Bourbon (which isnt that great).
Lafitte Guest House is in the quieter 1000 block and has some balconies.


Treme CoProducer David Mills Dies

The new HBO series the Treme is set in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.  For those that lived it, it is more than a TV show, it is real life.  Nothing brings “real life” home more than death.  I was background (an extra) in a Cafe Du Monde scene for the new HBO series  Treme’ yesterday. So I was there when co-producer David Mills collapsed during filming.  He was taken away by ambulance but we were not really sure what had happened. I just found out he passed away as the result of a brain aneurysm. David Mills was an Emmy-award-winning writer for HBO’s The Wire and co-executive producer of the upcoming drama Treme, set in New Orleans. He was 48 years old.   Rest in peace David.  See the attached article for more info.

by Sharon Denise Talbot 

http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118017128.html?categoryid=14&cs=1


What is a good website to get new orleans saints merchandisee in australia?

I am looking to purchase new orleans saints stuff for my room and to wear.do you know of any websites with new orleans saints merchandise

You can try the NFL site. I’m sure they will ship to Australia. The Saints are a good team to root for.

http://www.nflshop.com/home/index.jsp


Travelling Should Help You Relax And Open New Possibilities For You. Learn More By Reading These Tips.

Almost everyone loves to travel, but many people do not love planning for a vacation. It can be frustrating and tedious to ensure everything is order for a trip. The following tips will give you all the help you need to plan an enjoyable trip.

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The Lost Bayou Ramblers at French Quarter Fest 2009

The Lost Bayou Ramblers perform at the French Quarter Festival, April 18, 2009. New Orleans, Louisiana. I don’t know the name of this song. Sorry about the camera work, but the dancers got in the way and I moved for a better spot. My bad!
www.lostbayouramblers.com
www.myspace.com/lostbayouramblers

Duration : 0:3:12

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New Orleans’ best cocktails: The Sazerac

Master mixologist Chris McMillian walks us through the history and preparation of New Orleans classic cocktails.

Duration : 0:5:21

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Preparing For A Hurricane – What Are The Effects And Aftermath Of A Hurricane?

Nature’s fury is mankind’s nemesis. Natural disasters may be one of the only challenges planet Earth has left for us. We’ve learned to shape the land, modify crops, create new breeds of animals, and tame the wild beasts. But we haven’t learned how to stop a natural disaster like a hurricane. There’s little we can do when nature decides to release its fury on us. We can’t stop it, but we can try to protect ourselves and our property.

The words “hurricane” and “typhoon” describe a meteorological event known as a tropical cyclone. These storm systems are characterized by a zone of low pressure at the center and large thunderstorms that produce high winds and floods of rain.
These systems form almost exclusively in the earth’s tropical regions, spinning in a counterclockwise direction in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.

Scientists have identified seven major basins where these tropical storm typically form. Four major basins are in the Pacific (North Central, Northeastern, Northwestern, and South/Southwestern), three are in the Indian Ocean (Northern, Southwestern, and Southeastern), and one is in the Atlantic (Northern). In 2004, the first documented tropical storm formed in the Southern Atlantic, striking Brazil.

Hurricane seasons vary geographically, appearing in a region’s late summer, where the difference in temperatures between the air and sea are at their greatest. The most deadly hurricane on record struck the Ganges Delta in Bangladesh, killing from 300,000 to a million people. The Northern Indian basin has, since the early 1900s, been victim to the most and the most deadly hurricanes. Hurricanes are highly destructive of property. The recent Hurricane Katrina in the United States caused over $80 billion in property damages.

Local governments tend to take most preventive measures to limit the loss of life and property. Most towns and cities create emergency plans, using sirens to alert citizens of coming danger. Emergency broadcast systems are in place to keep people informed. And many communities store food, water, and medicines in case of power or water system breakdowns.

Most people who live on or near coastlines will experience a hurricane at least once during their lifetime. For some, it is a frequent occurrence, and they are prepared to board up windows and doors and evacuate almost out of habit. But many of us need to know what to do in the event of a hurricane.

What Can I Expect if a Hurricane is Near my Area?

* Luckily, hurricanes are easier to spot and prepare for than other natural disasters. With the advent of modern satellites, scientists are able to observe cloud formations and movement and reliably predict the direction and timing of the storm.

* As the hurricane nears landfall and it is spotted on radar, meteorologists will let the public know it’s coming. At this early stage, many things could change. The storm can change in intensity and direction fairly quickly, so the local weather service can keep tabs and inform the community as the storm moves. During this period, local governments and emergency services begin to activate emergency plans and procedures.

* When the know the storm is coming their way, homeowners should begin to board up windows and doors and secure outdoor lawn furniture and equipment. As the storm nears, you and your family should evacuate the area. No sense taking needless chances.

* If you can’t leave the storm, you should have stocked up on emergency supplies like plenty of fresh water, canned foods, candles and batteries, a battery-operated radio, and fuel for the generator. Water shortages can become life-threatening after a hurricane strikes, so it’s a good idea to fill up every container you have – including your bathtub – with safe drinking water.

* The single most important item you will need during and after a major hurricane is a medical kit containing bandages, medical tape, antibiotics, and scissors. This may save your life by preventing serious infections if you or your family are injured.

* Long before the storm ever forms, you and your family should work out an emergency plan. Decide where to meet if people aren’t home. Store essential supplies that can be used or easily moved to the car. Decide in advance where you will take shelter, and who will be responsible for helping family members unable to care for themselves. Establish clear roles and responsibilities for shutting up the house and securing outdoor items. The better prepared your family is, the less likely they are to be overwhelmed by the hurricane, and the more likely you will all survive with minimal injury or property damage.

What Will Happen During a Hurricane?

* When it hits land, the hurricane can bring winds over 100 miles per hour that can pick up and throw objects around as if they were toys. Cars, roofs, large pieces of metal or wood, and other flying debris can smash into homes. There is little one can do in this situation, but finding the safest shelter is the best bet. You may not be able to prevent serious damage to your home, but you can protect your life.

* Should the incoming hurricane grow a category 4 or 5, you will be advised to seek evacuate or, at the least, seek higher ground. Avoid trying to sit it out in your basement, as you might be trapped in a flood situation.

* If you can or must evacuate your community, travel light. Take only those items that you will need over a 24-48 hour period. A change of clothes, drinking water, and food should be included in your evacuation gear.

* As you drive to the nearest mass transportation outlet or in your own automobile, drive slowly and carefully. High winds and whipping rains will make it difficult to see, and accidents become very likely. Do NOT panic. This could also cause needless accidents and spread fearful behavior to other people in the same situation.

* The hurricane will pass in a few hours, and you will mostly likely be allowed to return to your home. Don’t worry: the terrible flooding that kept people from returning to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina was not the norm. Levees broke down, creating an abnormal situation.

What about After the Hurricane?

* After a hurricane has happened, review your family’s actions to see if your plan was reasonable and effective. Hurricanes are a fact of life in coastal areas, and you can benefit from your experience by preparing a better plan for the next time.

* Communities can only decide AFTER the hurricane whether their emergency plan and procedures were adequate. One good indicator is low loss of life or injuries being reported. The level of property damage will also be a sign of how effective emergency procedures were.

* State, city, and local governments who go through a hurricane should take stock after the event to do what they can to improve their plan and procedures. Citizens should ask government representatives about the results of their performance reviews and insist on necessary improvements.

Emergency preparedness for hurricanes is everyone’s business and everyone’s responsibilities. While governments are preparing to protect citizens’ lives and property, individuals and families must plan their own solutions for personal health and safety and for protecting private property.

Abhishek Agarwal

http://www.articlesbase.com/home-security-articles/preparing-for-a-hurricane-what-are-the-effects-and-aftermath-of-a-hurricane-753949.html


Gary US Bonds “New Orleans” 1989

Gary US Bonds performing “New Orleans”

Duration : 0:3:12

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