Posts tagged "New Orleans French Quarter"

Carry a pocket knife on bourbon street?

Could I carry a decent sized pocket knife while walking up and down bourbon street? Going into bars and shops? Laws down there? Never been there before.

as long as the blade is not longer than 4 inches it’s not a problem.

but wearing it say on your belt, in a holder is not recommended as the policemen/bouncers may ask you to leave it at home or in your car.

so carry it if you want but keep it in your pocket or out of sight.


Does anyone know a good recipe for Bourbon Street Chicken?!?

Anything like the one used by Golden Corral, maybe?!

Ingredients:

4 chicken breasts
1 teaspoon ground ginger
4 ounces soy sauce
2 tablespoons dried onion flakes
1/2 cup brown sugar
3/8 cup bourbon whiskey
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

DIRECTIONS: Place chicken breasts in a 9×13 inch baking dish. In a small bowl combine the ginger, soy sauce, onion flakes, sugar, bourbon and garlic powder. Mix together and pour mixture over chicken. Cover dish and place in refrigerator. Marinate overnight. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Remove dish from refrigerator and remove cover. Bake in the preheated oven, basting frequently, for 1 1/2 hours or until chicken is well browned and juices run clear.
Yield: 4 Servings


New Orleans Hooray!

This is the video from my set at La Noir Comedy Theater in NEW ORLEANS! Some old stuff, some new stuff, enjoy it. I love NOLA now and you can tell because I called it NOLA. Honestly, the comedy down there is really tight and the people are so supportive, creative, and of course funny. Thank you New Orleans for the best trip of my life. I’m going to try and recreate that scene up here or (what is more likely than changing the CT) I’ll live there. Check ‘em out http://nolacomedy.com/

Duration : 0:6:4

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Travelling Should Help You Relax And Open New Possibilities For You. Learn More By Reading These Tips.

Almost everyone loves to travel, but many people do not love planning for a vacation. It can be frustrating and tedious to ensure everything is order for a trip. The following tips will give you all the help you need to plan an enjoyable trip.

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Soulfly “I and I” @ Bourbon Street NPR,FL 11/08/08

(add ” &fmt=18 ” for HQ version)
1 of 2 vids I took during Soulfly’s set @ Bourbon Street on the Conquer tour featuring Bleed the Sky, Incite, and Devastation on 11/08/2008

Duration : 0:4:42

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Bourbon Street, Mardi Gras 2009.AVI

If one of your next holiday celebrations is Mardi Gras, here’s a preview — sights and sounds in the French Quarter that I experienced in February 2009. Captured on my little Sony digicam.

Duration : 0:9:51

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78s – NOLA – Milt Raskin’s Hollywood Ragtimers

Nola Song

Felix Arndt – 1915: What the Mississippi Rag is to piano ragtime, Nola is to the genre of Novelty piano solos. While actually not a true novelty rag, it was certainly a pioneering effort in that direction and one of the most well known pieces of a style that would ultimately become a display of pianistic prowess. Arndt started out as a self-taught pianist and later studied with some of the best teachers in New York. He became a staff musician for the Duo-Art reproducing piano company, cutting many spectacular rolls totaling 3000 in all during his short tenure there. Nola was composed for his fiance of the time, Nola Locke, who was both a vocal teacher and professional concert singer. This piano solo caught on very quickly, and lyrics were later added to a simplified version of it. There was even a modified fox trot edition in the early 1920s. Unfortunately for all, Arndt’s life was cut short during the world-wide flu epidemic of 1918. Based on his few published compositions, he certainly had the potential to equal the talents of Billy Mayerl or Zez Confrey, both successful novelty and jazz composers.

Duration : 0:2:59

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Preparing For A Hurricane – What Are The Effects And Aftermath Of A Hurricane?

Nature’s fury is mankind’s nemesis. Natural disasters may be one of the only challenges planet Earth has left for us. We’ve learned to shape the land, modify crops, create new breeds of animals, and tame the wild beasts. But we haven’t learned how to stop a natural disaster like a hurricane. There’s little we can do when nature decides to release its fury on us. We can’t stop it, but we can try to protect ourselves and our property.

The words “hurricane” and “typhoon” describe a meteorological event known as a tropical cyclone. These storm systems are characterized by a zone of low pressure at the center and large thunderstorms that produce high winds and floods of rain.
These systems form almost exclusively in the earth’s tropical regions, spinning in a counterclockwise direction in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.

Scientists have identified seven major basins where these tropical storm typically form. Four major basins are in the Pacific (North Central, Northeastern, Northwestern, and South/Southwestern), three are in the Indian Ocean (Northern, Southwestern, and Southeastern), and one is in the Atlantic (Northern). In 2004, the first documented tropical storm formed in the Southern Atlantic, striking Brazil.

Hurricane seasons vary geographically, appearing in a region’s late summer, where the difference in temperatures between the air and sea are at their greatest. The most deadly hurricane on record struck the Ganges Delta in Bangladesh, killing from 300,000 to a million people. The Northern Indian basin has, since the early 1900s, been victim to the most and the most deadly hurricanes. Hurricanes are highly destructive of property. The recent Hurricane Katrina in the United States caused over $80 billion in property damages.

Local governments tend to take most preventive measures to limit the loss of life and property. Most towns and cities create emergency plans, using sirens to alert citizens of coming danger. Emergency broadcast systems are in place to keep people informed. And many communities store food, water, and medicines in case of power or water system breakdowns.

Most people who live on or near coastlines will experience a hurricane at least once during their lifetime. For some, it is a frequent occurrence, and they are prepared to board up windows and doors and evacuate almost out of habit. But many of us need to know what to do in the event of a hurricane.

What Can I Expect if a Hurricane is Near my Area?

* Luckily, hurricanes are easier to spot and prepare for than other natural disasters. With the advent of modern satellites, scientists are able to observe cloud formations and movement and reliably predict the direction and timing of the storm.

* As the hurricane nears landfall and it is spotted on radar, meteorologists will let the public know it’s coming. At this early stage, many things could change. The storm can change in intensity and direction fairly quickly, so the local weather service can keep tabs and inform the community as the storm moves. During this period, local governments and emergency services begin to activate emergency plans and procedures.

* When the know the storm is coming their way, homeowners should begin to board up windows and doors and secure outdoor lawn furniture and equipment. As the storm nears, you and your family should evacuate the area. No sense taking needless chances.

* If you can’t leave the storm, you should have stocked up on emergency supplies like plenty of fresh water, canned foods, candles and batteries, a battery-operated radio, and fuel for the generator. Water shortages can become life-threatening after a hurricane strikes, so it’s a good idea to fill up every container you have – including your bathtub – with safe drinking water.

* The single most important item you will need during and after a major hurricane is a medical kit containing bandages, medical tape, antibiotics, and scissors. This may save your life by preventing serious infections if you or your family are injured.

* Long before the storm ever forms, you and your family should work out an emergency plan. Decide where to meet if people aren’t home. Store essential supplies that can be used or easily moved to the car. Decide in advance where you will take shelter, and who will be responsible for helping family members unable to care for themselves. Establish clear roles and responsibilities for shutting up the house and securing outdoor items. The better prepared your family is, the less likely they are to be overwhelmed by the hurricane, and the more likely you will all survive with minimal injury or property damage.

What Will Happen During a Hurricane?

* When it hits land, the hurricane can bring winds over 100 miles per hour that can pick up and throw objects around as if they were toys. Cars, roofs, large pieces of metal or wood, and other flying debris can smash into homes. There is little one can do in this situation, but finding the safest shelter is the best bet. You may not be able to prevent serious damage to your home, but you can protect your life.

* Should the incoming hurricane grow a category 4 or 5, you will be advised to seek evacuate or, at the least, seek higher ground. Avoid trying to sit it out in your basement, as you might be trapped in a flood situation.

* If you can or must evacuate your community, travel light. Take only those items that you will need over a 24-48 hour period. A change of clothes, drinking water, and food should be included in your evacuation gear.

* As you drive to the nearest mass transportation outlet or in your own automobile, drive slowly and carefully. High winds and whipping rains will make it difficult to see, and accidents become very likely. Do NOT panic. This could also cause needless accidents and spread fearful behavior to other people in the same situation.

* The hurricane will pass in a few hours, and you will mostly likely be allowed to return to your home. Don’t worry: the terrible flooding that kept people from returning to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina was not the norm. Levees broke down, creating an abnormal situation.

What about After the Hurricane?

* After a hurricane has happened, review your family’s actions to see if your plan was reasonable and effective. Hurricanes are a fact of life in coastal areas, and you can benefit from your experience by preparing a better plan for the next time.

* Communities can only decide AFTER the hurricane whether their emergency plan and procedures were adequate. One good indicator is low loss of life or injuries being reported. The level of property damage will also be a sign of how effective emergency procedures were.

* State, city, and local governments who go through a hurricane should take stock after the event to do what they can to improve their plan and procedures. Citizens should ask government representatives about the results of their performance reviews and insist on necessary improvements.

Emergency preparedness for hurricanes is everyone’s business and everyone’s responsibilities. While governments are preparing to protect citizens’ lives and property, individuals and families must plan their own solutions for personal health and safety and for protecting private property.

Abhishek Agarwal

http://www.articlesbase.com/home-security-articles/preparing-for-a-hurricane-what-are-the-effects-and-aftermath-of-a-hurricane-753949.html


Royal Street – French Quarter New Orleans

A beautiful driving tour down Royal Street through the French Quarter in New Orleans, Louisiana. (while poorly whistling the saints song.)

Duration : 0:1:55

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WSP NOLA 10-28-01 Sandbox

NOLA 10-28-01 Sandbox

Duration : 0:7:25

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