Posts tagged "New Orleans French Quarter"

Moon over Bourbon Street

Yes, I know the song is about a werewolf, but it still works in a roundabout way. Shot in 1989. Uncompleted.

Duration : 0:4:14

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Things to do in New Orleans for the under 18 crowd(im17)?

I’ll be going down there in March and im looking for things to do while my rents are out doing whatever.
Any Clubs, attractions, anything for the under 18 crowd

Things a teenager can do in New Orleans:

Mardi Gras and the Jazz Festival are world famous events, but New Orleans hosts many festivals and celebrations throughout the year: www.nola.com/festivals

The Saint Charles Streetcar is the oldest continuously operating street railway in the world and is a "tourist attraction" in its own right. It is part of the public transit system, as are the Canal Street and Riverfront streetcar lines: www.norta.com

Wander around the French Quarter, enjoy the architecture, watch the street entertainers (do tip), and visit some of the historic buildings that have been turned into museums (go to www.frenchquarter.com and click on Historic Attractions).

Assuming the weather is good, you can collect a sandwich lunch and eat in the riverfront park (watch the shipping) or in Jackson Square (a very nice park).

The Riverwalk shopping center has an air-conditioned food court with dining overlooking the river (www.riverwalkmarketplace.com). The Canal Place shopping center is in the French Quarter and has a cinema and higher-end shopping (Saks 5th Avenue, Brooks Brothers, etc.). Magazine Street is a miles-long shopping district: www.magazinestreet.com

The lobby for the Westin Canal Place Hotel is on the 11th floor and overlooks the French Quarter. It is a great place for an afternoon drink/snack:(www.westin.com).

Cafe du Monde is in the French Quarter and you shouldn’t miss having cafe au lait & beignets (www.cafedumonde.com). Another great coffee shop is the Croissant d’Or (at 615 Ursulines Street), which is open from 7:00am to 2:00pm and has food in addition to pastry.

The Palm Court restaurant is very nice, has moderate prices, and offers traditional live jazz starting at 8:00pm: 1204 Decatur Street, tel 504-525-0200 (reservations are important and they are not open every day). The Palm Court is closed from about July 25th to about September 25th each year.

Maximo’s Italian Grill has great food and atmosphere: 1117 Decatur Street in the French Quarter, (504) 586-8883.

All of the famous restaurants (Antoine’s, Arnaud’s, Brennan’s, Commander’s Palace, etc.) have reopened. The Pelican Club (on Exchange Alley in the FQ) is not as well known but is the same type experience. Reservations are a good idea, and probably essential on weekends. Tujaques Restaurant (823 Decatur Street) is very traditional and has moderate prices: www.tujaguesrestaurant.com

Cafe Degas is a very French restaurant near City Park at 3127 Esplanade – which is not within walking distance of downtown (5 to 10 minutes by taxi). They are closed on Mondays & Tuesdays (504-945-5635).

The Napoleon House restaurant is at 500 Chartres Street in the FQ, and has a menu of great local dishes: www.napoleonhouse.com

Preservation Hall has traditional live Jazz, and doesn’t serve alcohol so all ages are welcome: www.preservationhall.com

New Orleans has ballet, opera, a symphony orchestra, and theatre:

www.nobadance.com
www.neworleansopera.org
www.lpomusic.com
www.lepetittheatre.com

There is a free ferry across the Mississippi at the "foot" of Canal Street. It is a short trip but like a harbor cruise w/o a guide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/canal_street_ferry

The Aquarium, Audubon Zoo, and the new Insectarium are world-class attractions (www.auduboninstitute.org) and you should see them if you can. The Zoo is several miles from downtown. You can drive to the Zoo (which has free parking) or take public transit from the French Quarter.

The Louisiana State Museum is in the French Quarter: http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/ New Orleans is also home to a number of other museums, such as the National World War II Museum (www.ddaymuseum.org) and the New Orleans Museum of Art (www.noma.org). Both can be reached by public transit: The WWII museum is in the central business district but a long walk from the French Quarter. NOMA is not within walking distance of downtown but has free parking. Go to www.neworleansmuseums.com for info on more museums.

New Orleans City Park has a variety of attractions + free parking. (www.neworleanscitypark.com).

Check www.frenchquarter.com and http://www.nola.com/visitor/ for ideas about other things to do.

Hope you have a great time!


Mardi Gras 2008: Bourbon Street

Mardi Gras 2008: Bourbon Street

Duration : 0:1:28

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Do the strippers take off their bottoms during a lap dance on bourbon street in New Orleans? Not VIP?

Barely Legal mostly.

no

strip clubs are pretty tame compared to most places.

they often will go down to a tiny g string.


The Culinary Tour: a Gem in the Realm of Vacations

If you’re an avid traveller, you’re likely to have taken all the ‘usual’ vacations – from beach breaks and mountain retreats to spa getaways. And if you don’t get the opportunity to travel much, you’ll undoubtedly want your trips to be extraordinary and well-worth your time. The reality is that while there are countless types of fulfilling recreational pursuits out there, travellers are always looking for new and interesting ways to spend their vacations. After all, everyone wants to come away with a holiday experience that’s not only unique, but unforgettable.

A gem in the realm of vacations has long been the culinary tour. Yet this type of getaway has kept a perpetual sense of novelty, quite simply because there are so many ways to relish it. When you go to a beach, you can expect sun, sand and waves; but when you take a tour reflecting all the cultural and culinary influences upon the cuisine of a region, you might come away with much more than you bargained for. Simply put, if you love travelling, enjoy trying new things and can’t get your fill of good food, a culinary tour is the perfect type of vacation for you.

No matter where you go these days, there’s something delicious to eat. But there are certainly parts of the US which boast a rich culinary history. One of these is undoubtedly New Orleans, Louisiana. Sure, New Orleans is famous for its Mardi Gras celebration and Jazz Fest; but the city, known as “The Big Easy,” is also world-renowned for its culinary customs. New Orleans is noted for its mix of cultures, each of which has held on to its past traditions in some way – and food, like music, just happens to be one of the most prominent of these traditions.

Tour the city’s most famous kitchens and dining rooms – particularly in the French quarter and along Bourbon Street – and learn about the many ethnic influences that have helped shape its history and unique cuisine. Pick up on the culinary contributions of historic restaurants in the area, dating from 1840 to present, and learn the distinctions between Creole and Cajun foods! No matter how you go about it, you can’t go wrong with a culinary tour in New Orleans.

Alternatively, why not combine a culinary tour with a wine-tasting excursion? Napa Valley, California is undoubtedly the ideal destination if this idea strikes your fancy. Napa Valley is the American capital of food and wine, and a region which attracts countless visitors from around the world each year. By touring a winery, you can come to appreciate the various processes involved in producing an exquisite wine – from harvesting and fermentation to ageing. And aside from all the fantastic culinary treasures and premium wines, you can expect stunning, picturesque scenery. Whether you’re a novice or an accomplished wine connoisseur, a wine and culinary tour in Napa Valley is guaranteed to delight you. Moreover, Napa Valley is just 30 miles north of San Francisco, so you could easily make your way down to try the culinary treats of the “Golden Gate City” – which includes those in America’s largest Chinatown.

If you’re considering a culinary tour, rest assured that you’ll find a number of fantastic options for accommodation – regardless of whether you’re off to the east coast, west coast or deep south. A culinary tour is truly one of the best ways to become acquainted with a city’s culture and unique character – so why not book a culinary tour today and prepare to have your taste buds dazzled!

Martin Mcallister

http://www.articlesbase.com/travel-articles/the-culinary-tour-a-gem-in-the-realm-of-vacations-90949.html


Going to New Orleans to watch my Saints. Gonna watchit it on Bourbon Street?

I need to find the cheapest deal ever, where can I find it, leaving in the morning of the 6th, departing in the morning of the 8th, where can i find a cheap deal?

That is the first weekend of Mardi Gras parades, so "cheapest deal ever" probably isn’t realistic.

Check travel sites like Expedia & Orbitz and also check: www.frenchquarterhotels.com

You may also want to talk to a real travel agency wherever you live.

Good luck!


Mr. Carriere And Knucklehead

New Orleans is filled with plenty of colorful characters. This article “Mr. Carriere And Knucklehead” is just an example of one of them. There are additional links at the end of this article that will lead you to other sites that offer information about New Orleans attractions.

 

When you come to the New Orleans French Quarter you can’t help but notice the colorful mule drawn carriages throughout the Quarter streets. A relaxing buggy ride is often just the thing for foot weary sight seers, history buffs or romantic couples who want to snuggle a little closer than walking will allow.

These rides also include a narrated tour of the historic French Quarter and the renowned “Cities of the Dead”. No matter how much I think I know about New Orleans there is always more I don’t know. I love visiting with a particular buggy driver and his sidekick, Knucklehead. A virtual walking history book this guy knows his stuff. With thirty-five years of being a NOLA tour guide under his belt Mr. Carriere is as much a Big Easy attraction as the landmarks people flock to the Crescent City to see.

Twelve bucks for a thirty minute ride with someone who knows the streets and the stories as well as Mr. Carriere and Knucklehead is a hell of a deal. If you have never done the buggy ride thing or even if you have, treat yourself to a half hour with a favorite French Quarter fixture. Let Mr. Carriere take you on a scenic ride and regale you with NOLA tales of the past and present. Look for the lavender colored buggy parked in front of Jackson Square, feed Knucklehead a carrot and take in the sights and sounds of the historic Vieux Carre’ with a master storyteller.

The cadence of Knucklehead’s hoofs and timbre of Mr. Carriere’s voice are perfect compliments to the cacophony of sounds that resonant through the French Quarter. With plenty of tours to choose from this one covers all the bases. Informative but interesting, entertaining and amusing this is definitely one for your New Orleans “To Do” list. Enjoy the ride!

By Sharon Denise Talbot

Disclaimer

Trip Advisor – Things To Do In New Orleans

New Orleans Online – Things To Do And See

US News – Best Things To Do In New Orleans

 


THE ASCONA ALL STARS Bourbon Street Parade

***IF YOU LIKE THIS THEN PLEASE SUBSCRIBE***
THE ASCONA ALL STARS Bourbon Street Parade 9:09
Jon-Erik Kellso (cornet), Dan Barrett (trombone), Sammy Rimington (clarinet), Frank Robensheuten (tenor saxophone), Butch Thompson (piano),
Lino Patruno (banjo), Truch Parham (banjo), Trevor Richards (drums)
Ascona 1999

http://www.linopatruno.it

http://www.cambiamusica.it

http://www.michaelsupnick.com

Adolphe Paul Barbarin (May 5, 1899 Feb 17, 1969) was a New Orleans jazz drummer, usually regarded (along with Baby Dodds) as one of the very best of the pre-Big Band era jazz drummers.
Paul Barbarin’s year of birth is often given as 1901, but his brother Louis Barbarin (born 1902) said he was quite sure that Paul was several years older than him, and Paul Barbarin simply refused to answer the year of his birth in an interview at Tulane’s Jazz Archives.
From the late 1910s on, Barbarin divided his time between Chicago, New York City and New Orleans, and touring with such bands as those of Joe “King” Oliver, Luis Russell, Louis Armstrong, and Henry Red Allen. From the 1950s on he usually led his own band. He, along with Louis Cottrell, Jr. founded and led the second incarnation of the Onward Brass Band from 1960 to 1969.
Barbarin was an accomplished and knowledgeable musician, a member of ASCAP, and the composer of a number of pop tunes and Dixieland standards, including Come Back Sweet Papa, Don’t Forget To Mess Around (When You’re Doing The Charleston), Bourbon Street Parade, and (Paul Barbarin’s) Second Line.
Paul Barbarin died on February 17, 1969 while playing a New Orleans Mardi Gras parade.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Barbarin

Duration : 0:9:10

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Laredo Street

This is a song I recorded a few years ago with my friend Rudy Divona.

Duration : 3 min 47 sec

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New Orleans – the Top 5 Reasons to Visit

The Crescent City is resplendent with beautiful music, savory cuisine and a nightlife that will leave your head ringing and your heart wanting more.  Planning a trip down to the Big Easy?  Make sure you have a few extra notches in your belt, a shiny pair of dancing shoes and a desire to have the time of your life.  My top 5 list will give you a heads up on the best reasons to book a trip and enjoy the unique culture and ambiance of New Orleans.

1.  The French Quarter
As they say, you can’t have diamonds without pressure.  The French Quarter is just that, a cultural diamond resulting from the collision between the original French and Spanish settlers of the Big Easy.  Contained between the Mississippi River, Rampart Street, Esplanade Avenue and Canal Street, the French Quarter packs in over 300 restaurants, numberless bars, sensational music and a nightlife second to none in the United States.  While visiting make sure to experience Jackson Square.  After your stroll, tip back a few drinks at Lafitte’s Blacksmith Bar, the oldest continually occupied bar in the United States, once owned by the famous pirate Jean Lafitte.  

2.  Spending a night in the French Quarter
After a long night of revelry, you’ll be ready to relax and enjoy one of the many hotels available in the French Quarter.  If you are in the mood for an upscale location stewed in the ambiance and atmosphere unique to the French Quarter, the Soniat House (http://www.soniathouse.com/) is a fantastic choice.  A series of townhouses dating back to the early eighteen hundreds, each room is painstakingly decorated in rare vintage antiques.  The courtyards and fountains surrounding this wonderful hotel will wash away your stress and let you soak in the spirit of New Orleans.  While the Soniat House is a bit expensive the experience is worth the trouble.  If you are looking for a good deal, but still want to be in the thick of the French Quarter there is still hope.  Many New Orleans Hotels offer mini-vacation packages at highly discounted rates (http://www.vacation-offer.com/special/new/30).  Generally these deals are designed to show you the timeshare offerings of the resort and they can give you access to some pretty nice amenities for the days that you just want to relax.

3.  Julia Row
Called the “SoHo of the South,” this section of vintage townhouses on the 600 block of Julia Street is home to New Orleans best art galleries.  The Contemporary Art Center (http://www.cacno.org/) is the main attraction showcasing the areas art revival.  The giant building houses massive galleries that will put a smile on the face of any contemporary art lover.  With a $5 admission, the Contemporary Art Center is a must-see attraction in the Big Easy.

4.  The Sound of Music
When it comes to New Orleans, music is the main attraction.  A stroll through the French Quarter will carry you away with the sounds of Zydeco, Jazz and Blues.  The annual Jazz and Blues festival in late April offers a musical experience unequal in the United States.  Showcasing some of the finest names in the Blues business this festival is a sight to see. If you don’t mind standing, Preservation Hall in the French Quarter is the ultimate venue to take in the traditional jazz famous in the Big Easy.

5.  The Food
Food in New Orleans is like a precious treasure hidden in plain sight.  From Creole to straight French food, your taste buds will be overwhelmed with the spices and flavor that draw massive crowds every day into the heart of the city. Antoine’s, serving French-Creole cuisine since the 1840’s, is near the top of the list.  For a more casual night be sure to visit Bacco and treat yourself to the region’s richest blend of fine cuisine and a romantic atmosphere.

Whatever your appetite may be, the Crescent City offers a wide variety of activities and culture splendor to treat you to a once in a lifetime travel experience.  If you ever make it home after your trip, the unique Creole charm is guaranteed to pull you back to Big Easy for another adventure in the future.

Byron Mackelroy

http://www.articlesbase.com/travel-articles/new-orleans-the-top-5-reasons-to-visit-715998.html


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