Posts tagged "New Orleans Attractions"

Mr. Carriere and Knucklehead

New Orleans

When you come to the New Orleans French Quarter you can’t help but notice the colorful mule drawn carriages throughout the Quarter streets. A relaxing buggy ride is often just the thing for foot weary sight seers, history buffs or romantic couples who want to snuggle a little closer than walking will allow.

These rides also include a narrated tour of the historic French Quarter and the renowned “Cities of the Dead”. No matter how much I think I know about New Orleans there is always more I don’t know. I love visiting with a particular buggy driver and his sidekick, Knucklehead. A virtual walking history book this guy knows his stuff. With thirty-five years of being a NOLA tour guide under his belt Mr. Carriere is as much a Big Easy attraction as the landmarks people flock to the Crescent City to see.

Twelve bucks for a thirty minute ride with someone who knows the streets and the stories as well as Mr. Carriere and Knucklehead is a hell of a deal. If you have never done the buggy ride thing or even if you have, treat yourself to a half hour with a favorite French Quarter fixture. Let Mr. Carriere take you on a scenic ride and regale you with NOLA tales of the past and present. Look for the lavender colored buggy parked in front of Jackson Square, feed Knucklehead a carrot and take in the sights and sounds of the historic Vieux Carre’ with a master storyteller.

The cadence of Knucklehead’s hoofs and timbre of Mr. Carriere’s voice are perfect compliments to the cacophony of sounds that resonant through the French Quarter. With plenty of tours to choose from this one covers all the bases. Informative but interesting, entertaining and amusing this is definitely one for your New Orleans “To Do” list. Enjoy the ride!

By Sharon Denise Talbot

New Orleans


HEAVY BRASS Part One

A silent musical comedy from New Orleans. . . if you can imagine that.

Duration : 7 min 35 sec

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What time do bars on bourbon street close on the weekends?


They close??? I haven’t been post Katrina, but the last time I was there there were still clubs open at 4 and bars already ope at 9 when I started over.


Mardi Gras brawl

Fight on Bourbon Street during Mardi Gras broken up by the cops.

Duration : 0:1:34

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Sting – Moon Over Bourbon Street – live acoustic version 1985

It’s Robbie Coltrane (Cracker , Harry Potter) that’s running away at the beginning. Shot at the end by Jools Holland (Squeeze).

Recorded in 1985, the same year that the LP was released, this recording is acoustic based like the Twilight version.

Duration : 0:3:27

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What could happen to New Orleans if areas to the north of it experienced heavy precipitation?

Why would a city, such as New Orleans, at the mouth of the Mississippi River, be especially concerned with precipitation in other parts of the country? What could happen to New Orleans if areas to the north of it experienced heavy precipitation?

Assuming you are asking if heavy rains or other runoff would raise the level of the Mississippi River, that happens every year during Spring. It’s why the river is lined with high levees – to prevent the overflowing river from flooding the areas around it.

The "Great Flood of 1927" was the event that caused the construction of the modern levee system, though levees were built along the river since Europeans settled in Louisiana.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Mississippi_Flood_of_1927

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnet_Carre_Spillway

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morganza_Spillway

Note that the levees protecting New Orleans in 1927 were not breached by the high waters.

Also note that the city is not at the mouth of the Mississippi. New Orleans is 90 miles from the mouth of the river.


SECRET NEW ORLEANS: TJ & Di Théâtre d’Orléans! Voodoo Vapors!

VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL! (series) episode #13! TJ Fisher and Di Harris adventures! The Hoo-hah Ladies of the French Quarter live life out loud! In this retro-style film clip — the funky, fun, chic and slightly mad fashionistas open up their world and take you with them! To unexpected places and French Quarter haunts! Tag along with the mad hattresses, and enjoy an armchair Voodoo-trance “window shopping” spell and spree on Royal Street, and beyond! Snippets of French Quarter life!

Well seasoned by an intriguing life stories that resemble weird Hollywood sagas flavored by sensational speculation, TJ and Di remain full of humor and fanciful visions. They are fearless wunderkind prone to incite, without compunction, a firestorm of controversy in their wake. The zany duo enjoy poking fun at themselves, as well as Hollywood “It” girls, rock star royalty, high society butterflies and Hollywood elite. Glitterati, literati, pundits and paparazzi are all fair game for VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL!

In an intoxicating old town that truly embraces the individual, these two one-of-a-kind women — similar to other colorful local fixtures — start trends instead of following them. First jokester TJ hunts for her koo-koo tweety bird, who is roosted atop her head. Playfully poised in front of the storefront window display of Di’s French Quarter international boutique, TJ gets the lowdown on tastemaker retailing. Zogwald’s features hip-glamour clothing and timeless collectibles. Next Di is seen shopping at the famed and gritty Bourbon Street Quartermaster Deli, a storied 24-hour grocery store of comfort food and colorful characters. The double-trouble pair of wild and whacky divas window-shop at Fleur De Paris couture millinery shop. Girly-girl, romantic and sophisticated hats! Chapeaus! Couture! Last the two appear in a quick-snapshot montage of French Quarter destinations, in a town uniquely well suited to a rolling parade of music stars, Mardi Gras queens, pretty princesses, glamour girls, big-eyed tourists and troublemakers.

Old world crawfish boils, bands, music, mystery, madness, hatboxes, vapors, steeples, spires, splendor — the New Orleans way! The Who Dat attitude!

See kicky-cool Swamp Empress TJ Fisher and Peacock Princess Di Harris, in additional Tanzmanianmudbug YouTube postings:

http://www.youtube.com/user/Tanzmanianmudbug

Always at the cornerstone of eccentric behavior, TJ drives a ’59 pink Cadillac convertible named Lulabell, and Di rides a 1968 “My Fair Lady” model banana-seat Stingray. TJ Fisher is the accolade-winning author of multiple works of New Orleans-based nonfiction and fiction. Award-winning designer Di Harris is the fashion maven and vintage vamp pinup artist behind the trademark “Oonkas Boonkas” style chic. (TJ also maintains a home in Palm Beach, Florida and Di in Melbourne, Australia.)
Read more about TJ at:
?http://www.tjfisher.com
?http://www.tjfisher.net

In New Orleans town, the time-honored circle of rosary beads, revelry and rue come together. Intriguing tales of unconventionalities abound. A wildly personal place, customs, sacraments and superstitions do not fit easily into any one category. That is what makes New Orleans particularly interesting, entertaining, amusing and controversial. It is a community of rich ethnicities, religions, opinions. The ancient city is a unique place of worship and frolic, introspection and self-discovery — for the holy and hedonistic alike. New Orleanians are mainly spiritual and yet separate and aloof, sometimes religious and sometimes not, deeply influenced by our existence and death on the edge. Known to be unorthodox, ideological, cryptic and philosophical, the people of New Orleans often take what they want from Catholicism, Baptism, Judaism and Voodooism — forming new conjunctions with their own cherished traditions. The truth is that the Crescent City takes in life with a different set of eyes, with an open and caring “anything-goes” attitude. Le Bon Temps Roule. Some call the locals idiosyncratic and iconoclastic, and it is true. Passions run rampant. Emotions are poured, provoked and stirred. Senses ignited. The spirit and soul of the city — the unique history, culture and customs — reign supreme.

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HBO and David Simon’s lush new drama series Treme “gets” New Orleans; they definitely get it, do you? Do you get the resilient heart, soul, spirit and humor of the people and places of New Orleans…?

DO YOU KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO MISS NEW ORLEANS?

Duration : 0:4:53

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David Hodges – LifeBoat (Live at Bourbon Street)

Courtesy of SequenceFilms.

Duration : 0:5:0

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Learn New Orleans Style Cooking

There is nothing better than some New Orleans style cooking y’all.  You can learn how so you don’t have to wait to be in NOLA to get some.

New Orleans

New Orleans is known for fun and food. There are so many different influences in New Orleans it will amaze you. It shows in the way the people of New Orleans have fun and in the food they eat.

There are several New Orleans cooking schools that are located in different locations in the city. People travel from all over the world to experience the unique culture and flavors of New Orleans style cooking. The style of cooking found in New Orleans isn’t found anywhere else in the world.

New Orleans Cooking School

New Orleans Cooking School

The style of cooking found in New Orleans is a blend of Creole, Cajun, French, Spanish and American Indian influences. The portion that most people seem to be aware of is the Cajun influence. This comes from the Cajun or Acadian culture in Louisiana.

The part that is unique in New Orleans cooking schools is the history of the foods. When you attend a cooking school in New Orleans you will not only learn how to cook but also the story behind the food. Each style and separate dish within a style has a story behind it. This is something that is not found as much in other places.

So if you are looking to learn something new in the world of cooking, experience something new and have a great time then schedule some time at one of the many cooking schools in New Orleans. While you are in New Orleans, there a many other things to do and experience that you can easily spend a week and not see everything.

New Orleans

Resources:

 

New Orleans Cooking

New Orleans School of Cooking


Things to do in New Orleans for the under 18 crowd(im17)?

I’ll be going down there in March and im looking for things to do while my rents are out doing whatever.
Any Clubs, attractions, anything for the under 18 crowd

Things a teenager can do in New Orleans:

Mardi Gras and the Jazz Festival are world famous events, but New Orleans hosts many festivals and celebrations throughout the year: www.nola.com/festivals

The Saint Charles Streetcar is the oldest continuously operating street railway in the world and is a "tourist attraction" in its own right. It is part of the public transit system, as are the Canal Street and Riverfront streetcar lines: www.norta.com

Wander around the French Quarter, enjoy the architecture, watch the street entertainers (do tip), and visit some of the historic buildings that have been turned into museums (go to www.frenchquarter.com and click on Historic Attractions).

Assuming the weather is good, you can collect a sandwich lunch and eat in the riverfront park (watch the shipping) or in Jackson Square (a very nice park).

The Riverwalk shopping center has an air-conditioned food court with dining overlooking the river (www.riverwalkmarketplace.com). The Canal Place shopping center is in the French Quarter and has a cinema and higher-end shopping (Saks 5th Avenue, Brooks Brothers, etc.). Magazine Street is a miles-long shopping district: www.magazinestreet.com

The lobby for the Westin Canal Place Hotel is on the 11th floor and overlooks the French Quarter. It is a great place for an afternoon drink/snack:(www.westin.com).

Cafe du Monde is in the French Quarter and you shouldn’t miss having cafe au lait & beignets (www.cafedumonde.com). Another great coffee shop is the Croissant d’Or (at 615 Ursulines Street), which is open from 7:00am to 2:00pm and has food in addition to pastry.

The Palm Court restaurant is very nice, has moderate prices, and offers traditional live jazz starting at 8:00pm: 1204 Decatur Street, tel 504-525-0200 (reservations are important and they are not open every day). The Palm Court is closed from about July 25th to about September 25th each year.

Maximo’s Italian Grill has great food and atmosphere: 1117 Decatur Street in the French Quarter, (504) 586-8883.

All of the famous restaurants (Antoine’s, Arnaud’s, Brennan’s, Commander’s Palace, etc.) have reopened. The Pelican Club (on Exchange Alley in the FQ) is not as well known but is the same type experience. Reservations are a good idea, and probably essential on weekends. Tujaques Restaurant (823 Decatur Street) is very traditional and has moderate prices: www.tujaguesrestaurant.com

Cafe Degas is a very French restaurant near City Park at 3127 Esplanade – which is not within walking distance of downtown (5 to 10 minutes by taxi). They are closed on Mondays & Tuesdays (504-945-5635).

The Napoleon House restaurant is at 500 Chartres Street in the FQ, and has a menu of great local dishes: www.napoleonhouse.com

Preservation Hall has traditional live Jazz, and doesn’t serve alcohol so all ages are welcome: www.preservationhall.com

New Orleans has ballet, opera, a symphony orchestra, and theatre:

www.nobadance.com
www.neworleansopera.org
www.lpomusic.com
www.lepetittheatre.com

There is a free ferry across the Mississippi at the "foot" of Canal Street. It is a short trip but like a harbor cruise w/o a guide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/canal_street_ferry

The Aquarium, Audubon Zoo, and the new Insectarium are world-class attractions (www.auduboninstitute.org) and you should see them if you can. The Zoo is several miles from downtown. You can drive to the Zoo (which has free parking) or take public transit from the French Quarter.

The Louisiana State Museum is in the French Quarter: http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/ New Orleans is also home to a number of other museums, such as the National World War II Museum (www.ddaymuseum.org) and the New Orleans Museum of Art (www.noma.org). Both can be reached by public transit: The WWII museum is in the central business district but a long walk from the French Quarter. NOMA is not within walking distance of downtown but has free parking. Go to www.neworleansmuseums.com for info on more museums.

New Orleans City Park has a variety of attractions + free parking. (www.neworleanscitypark.com).

Check www.frenchquarter.com and http://www.nola.com/visitor/ for ideas about other things to do.

Hope you have a great time!


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