Posts tagged "New Orleans Attractions"

Bourbon Cookies

You may enjoy eating bourbon with your cookies, we enjoy bourbon in our cookies. Watch BourbonBlog.com for more videos.

Duration : 2 min 52 sec

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Arlo Guthrie to Play the New New Orleans New Year Celebration in Jackson Square

New Orleans New Year Celebration

Here is a press release from 2005, when Arlo Guthrie played a New Year’s Eve gig in New Orleans. New Orleans has always attracted musicians from all over the world.

Austin, TX (PRWEB) December 30, 2005

Showcasing the soul and spirit of the Crescent City, the Countdown Club presents the 2005 New New Orleans New Year Celebration sponsored by Glazer’s Companies of Louisiana and Pyrotecnico of Louisiana at Jackson Square on Decatur Street, Saturday, December 31, 2005. For information call (985) 630-4604 or log on to www.neworleansonline.com.

Arlo Guthrie & Friends arrived in New Orleans on December 16 to play two benefit concerts at Tipitina’s on the Amtrak City of New Orleans train. Arlo and musical friends had performed benefit concerts along the train’s route starting in Chicago and riding down to New Orleans raising thousands of dollars for small clubs and musicians to get them the “gear” they need get up and running. Arlo’s idea of helping to rebuild the infrastructure of the city’s music scene caught attention and support from across the United States and around the world. Arlo was the first artist to make a hit of Steve Goodman’s song, “City of New Orleans.” The Countdown Club extended an invitation then and there to Arlo to come back for the New Year’s celebration.

Finishing touches are being made to the gumbo pot that will ascend a pole to signal the midnight hour and launch a barrage of fireworks over the Mississippi River for the New New Orleans New Year celebration in the French Quarter. “ I think I can say without a doubt that New Orleans will be the only city in the world to drop a gumbo pot,” says Brian Kern of Blaine Kern’s Mardi Gras World and Vice President of the Crescent City Countdown Club.

Produced by the Crescent City Countdown Club, festivities will begin at 8 p.m. in traditional New Orleans style with the Coolbone Brass Band, followed by Vivaz from 8:45 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Arlo Guthrie will take the stage to perform his hit “City of New Orleans” and other favorites at 9:45 p.m. At 10:30 p.m. Louisiana LeRoux will play up to the midnight hour.

All eyes will then be cast to the top of the Jax Brewhouse Condominiums for the gumbo pot drop as a barrage of fireworks blankets the sky over the Mississippi River. Choreographed to music by New Orleans musicians, the exquisite “Symphony in the Sky” will be simulcast live on Magic 101.9 FM and WWL 870 AM and heard in 38 states across the U.S.

Log on to BestNewOrleansHotels.com to register to win tickets to New Orleans donated by Amtrak.

New Orleans New Year Celebration

For information or to schedule an interview with Arlo please contact Cash Edwards, Music Services, 512/294-3126.

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Related New Orleans Press Releases


Sting – Moon over bourbon street – Mawazine 2010

Sting – Moon over bourbon street – Mawazine 2010

Duration : 0:5:45

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What was the original way New Orleans was pronounced?

I understand the locals normally say N’orlins – Stress on the Nor.
I was just curious if there was an original French way in which Orleans may have been pronounced. Currently I say New Orlins – stress on the Or, but when I was young I would say New Orleens – stress on the leens.

Only Hollywood and tourists call the city N”Awlins.

The original name of the city was in French: Nouvelle Orleans. It is pronounced new vell ore lay on.

There are two "normal” pronunciations today:

New Or le ans (Orleans is 3 syllables)
New Or leans (Orleans is 2 syllables)

The issue is somewhat confused by the fact the City of New Orleans is also (same boundaries) Orleans Parish (parish = county). Everyone says Or leans Parish (Orleans with 2 syllables).


Bourbon Street Parade – Ken Colyer’s Jazzmen – 1954

Wonderful line up for the Jazz Festival in London 1954. Ken Colyer, Jim Bray, Lonnie Donegan, Bruce Turner, Monty Sunshine.

Duration : 0:4:41

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Barack Obama in New Orleans, LA

Barack addressed a crowd of 3,500 supporters at Tulane University on February 7, 2008.

Duration : 0:7:46

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Jazzing Up Your Advocacy Efforts: Lessons From New Orleans

Long time readers of the tipsheet know that the guru and her husband often go to the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. If you aren’t sure what that is, check out www.nojazzfest.com. If you want to know what others are doing in New Orleans check out the webcam at Tropical Isle on Bourbon Street anytime after 6:00pm or so…

As usual, in the midst of three days of fun, frivolity and fantabulous jazz I, of course, got to thinking about advocacy. I mean, wouldn’t you? And this wasn’t just in a daiquiri-induced haze while wandering around the French Quarter. No, in fact, I was struck by the similarities between Jazz Fest and every advocacy campaign with which I’ve been ever been affiliated.

Following are five techniques you should use to get you through any advocacy campaign – or music festival for that matter.

Strategize: One does not just walk into Jazz Fest and wander around. With eleven stages offering up multiple acts, only careful planning will ensure that you’ll catch what interests you most. At Jazz Fest, this tactic applies doubly to your food options. Before the festival, my husband and I looked over the musical acts and decided what we wanted to see in about ½ hour. We spent another 3 hours drooling over the food. Jambalaya. Bread Pudding. Po Boys. Muffalettas. See, no one can eat everything. But you can eat some of everything with a good plan – and stretchy pants.

The same applies to your advocacy efforts (the strategizing, not the stretchy pants). Think of your strategy development in four stages: First, you want to outline your specific goal – usually in terms of dollars or policy outcomes. Then you want to look at the variety of ways to reach that goal. For appropriations, for example, this might include earmarks, additional line item funds or even report language directing the agency to spend more. Third, consider the competition, distractions and road blocks standing in your way, such as other worthy programs in need of funding (yes, there are a few). Finally, in light of all this information, identify your preferred path. We navigated through Jazz Fest using this four step process – I know it will work for advocacy.

Develop Themes: Themes help you develop a strategy and stick with it — even in the face of temptation. Saturday, for example, was “fried things” day in the food court. Sure, I was tempted by the chocolate dipped strawberries and the Veggie Mufaletta. But I had made a commitment to “fried things.” I wasn’t going to let “fried things” down. I stayed focused and the fried green tomatoes and fried eggplant did not disappoint. Then on Sunday I shifted my theme to “things with cheese,” thus reveling in many other delights at the festival.

Advocacy efforts can be as distracting as the Jazz Fest food courts. One moment Congress is happily focused on transportation issues – two seconds later they’re debating the War in Iraq and then the Farm Bill. It can be difficult to stay focused on your issue when 25 different and equally compelling issues are being waived in your face. Don’t be tempted! Find a theme and stick to it through thick and thin.

Improvise: On the flip side, all the strategizing and thematic development in the world won’t help you when all your best laid plans go awry. Maybe that fabulous act (or fabulous Congressman) that you were looking forward to turns out to be not that fabulous after all. Disappointed, for example, in one of the acts I went to see, I stopped by another tent and danced, bopped and shouted my way through a phenomenal show from a blues / soul / jazz artist named Ruthie Foster (really, go look her up). I had never heard of her before and would never have found her if I hadn’t improvised.

Every once in a while circumstances might dictate that you abandon all your strategies and themes and just make stuff up as you go along. Don’t like that member of Congress? Go see if you can find a new one. Aren’t pleased with how the legislation is progressing? Find new and creative ways to change it in to something you can support.

Build Coalitions: On Saturday I parked myself in front of one of the three main outdoor stages and waited for one of the acts I REALLY wanted to see later in the day – Santana. I quickly became dependent on the kindness of strangers – as they became dependent on me. See, when you’re smack dab in the middle of a throng of 10,000 people, it’s hard to get out. So we built alliances and assigned jobs. Some people had the job of foraging for beer. Some went for food. Others shared umbrellas (as shields from the sun). My job was to help coalition members map out the shortest route from our fiefdom to the outside world. Without their help, I’m not sure I could have survived 8 long hours in the 90 degree heat.

Effective advocacy campaigns rely on coalitions as well. Maybe your partners aren’t helping you get beer – but in a winning coalition everyone performs specific tasks that keep the group moving toward the mission.

And, of course, there’s persistence. Votes won’t always go your way. Legislation won’t always be introduced in a timely fashion. The food court might even run out of Spinach Artichoke casserole (hey, it happened). But every year it gets a little easier and you learn a little more. You learn to bring your mud boots with you in case it rains. You learn to buy your sweet potato pies from Mr. Williams’ pie stand on Friday because he attends church on Saturday and will not be selling pies. You learn to stuff yourself with spinach artichoke casserole as soon as you get to the festival. Armed with this information (and enough beer, sunscreen and advocate motivation) you will be able to persevere until the fat lady (or Santana) sings.

Stephanie Vance
http://www.articlesbase.com/politics-articles/jazzing-up-your-advocacy-efforts-lessons-from-new-orleans-413273.html


What’s Bourbon Street like in November?

My friends and I will be going to the Alabama/LSU game and thought we’d spend a night or two in New Orleans. I’ve been there before for Mardis Gras and I know how crazy that can be. I wanted to know what Bourbon Street is like in the off season. Should we bring beads (and yes, we know that’s touristy, but we don’t mind 😉 Is it worth it to get a hotel with a balcony overlooking Bourbon?

It won’t be as crazy as Mardi Gras (nothing is) but there should be lots of people in town for the game. The weather in November is also usually nice.

There are only two (2) hotels with balcony rooms overlooking Bourbn Street:

Royal Sonesta
Ramada Inn on Bourbon

Balcony rooms can be fun. They also tend to be noisy (from the crowd on the street all night). If sleep is important don’t get a balcony room. You don’t need beeds and it’s actually against the law to throw them from the balcony to the crowd. Yes, people do it and the police don’t interfere unless it becomes a problem. If hotel security/management or the police tell you to stop then stop.


Dancing in the Street

This is a sketch from Food Dood, the 3rd episode of Boo! Bub? Boo. Bluh?

Watch the show here: http://blip.tv/file/2993441

Visit the Boo! Bub? Boo. Bluh? web site: http://piemerica.org/b4

Duration : 1 min 31 sec

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Bourbon Street, Mardi Gras 2009.AVI

If one of your next holiday celebrations is Mardi Gras, here’s a preview — sights and sounds in the French Quarter that I experienced in February 2009. Captured on my little Sony digicam.

Duration : 0:9:51

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