Posts tagged "Mardi Gras"

Things to do in New Orleans for the under 18 crowd(im17)?

I’ll be going down there in March and im looking for things to do while my rents are out doing whatever.
Any Clubs, attractions, anything for the under 18 crowd

Things a teenager can do in New Orleans:

Mardi Gras and the Jazz Festival are world famous events, but New Orleans hosts many festivals and celebrations throughout the year: www.nola.com/festivals

The Saint Charles Streetcar is the oldest continuously operating street railway in the world and is a "tourist attraction" in its own right. It is part of the public transit system, as are the Canal Street and Riverfront streetcar lines: www.norta.com

Wander around the French Quarter, enjoy the architecture, watch the street entertainers (do tip), and visit some of the historic buildings that have been turned into museums (go to www.frenchquarter.com and click on Historic Attractions).

Assuming the weather is good, you can collect a sandwich lunch and eat in the riverfront park (watch the shipping) or in Jackson Square (a very nice park).

The Riverwalk shopping center has an air-conditioned food court with dining overlooking the river (www.riverwalkmarketplace.com). The Canal Place shopping center is in the French Quarter and has a cinema and higher-end shopping (Saks 5th Avenue, Brooks Brothers, etc.). Magazine Street is a miles-long shopping district: www.magazinestreet.com

The lobby for the Westin Canal Place Hotel is on the 11th floor and overlooks the French Quarter. It is a great place for an afternoon drink/snack:(www.westin.com).

Cafe du Monde is in the French Quarter and you shouldn’t miss having cafe au lait & beignets (www.cafedumonde.com). Another great coffee shop is the Croissant d’Or (at 615 Ursulines Street), which is open from 7:00am to 2:00pm and has food in addition to pastry.

The Palm Court restaurant is very nice, has moderate prices, and offers traditional live jazz starting at 8:00pm: 1204 Decatur Street, tel 504-525-0200 (reservations are important and they are not open every day). The Palm Court is closed from about July 25th to about September 25th each year.

Maximo’s Italian Grill has great food and atmosphere: 1117 Decatur Street in the French Quarter, (504) 586-8883.

All of the famous restaurants (Antoine’s, Arnaud’s, Brennan’s, Commander’s Palace, etc.) have reopened. The Pelican Club (on Exchange Alley in the FQ) is not as well known but is the same type experience. Reservations are a good idea, and probably essential on weekends. Tujaques Restaurant (823 Decatur Street) is very traditional and has moderate prices: www.tujaguesrestaurant.com

Cafe Degas is a very French restaurant near City Park at 3127 Esplanade – which is not within walking distance of downtown (5 to 10 minutes by taxi). They are closed on Mondays & Tuesdays (504-945-5635).

The Napoleon House restaurant is at 500 Chartres Street in the FQ, and has a menu of great local dishes: www.napoleonhouse.com

Preservation Hall has traditional live Jazz, and doesn’t serve alcohol so all ages are welcome: www.preservationhall.com

New Orleans has ballet, opera, a symphony orchestra, and theatre:

www.nobadance.com
www.neworleansopera.org
www.lpomusic.com
www.lepetittheatre.com

There is a free ferry across the Mississippi at the "foot" of Canal Street. It is a short trip but like a harbor cruise w/o a guide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/canal_street_ferry

The Aquarium, Audubon Zoo, and the new Insectarium are world-class attractions (www.auduboninstitute.org) and you should see them if you can. The Zoo is several miles from downtown. You can drive to the Zoo (which has free parking) or take public transit from the French Quarter.

The Louisiana State Museum is in the French Quarter: http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/ New Orleans is also home to a number of other museums, such as the National World War II Museum (www.ddaymuseum.org) and the New Orleans Museum of Art (www.noma.org). Both can be reached by public transit: The WWII museum is in the central business district but a long walk from the French Quarter. NOMA is not within walking distance of downtown but has free parking. Go to www.neworleansmuseums.com for info on more museums.

New Orleans City Park has a variety of attractions + free parking. (www.neworleanscitypark.com).

Check www.frenchquarter.com and http://www.nola.com/visitor/ for ideas about other things to do.

Hope you have a great time!


What to do in New Orleans? Metairie safe & close to French-Q?

I am going during the Essence music festival. If you are from N.O. or have visited please give me your opinion on the best resturants, ferries boats, bars, club, attractions, etc. Don’t forget a safe place to stay and parking advice thanks!

Metairie is NOT close to the French Quarte – it is a mostly middle class suburb to the west of the city. Metairie was damaged by Katrina but did not suffer the really extensive flooding that devastated New Orleans so it has almost fully recovered.

Katrina flooded about 80% of New Orleans with salt water, and the water stayed for almost a month. Much of the city is still struggling to recover and all you have to do to see devastation is drive around. It will take years for NOLA to fully recover from Katrina.

However, the parts of the city that tourists usually visit were not flooded. It’s not a coincidence – the French Quarter and other old parts of the city were built on relatively high ground and only suffered wind damage from Katrina. Almost all of the damage has been repaired and you have to look closely in the FQ or city center to see that Katrina happened at all.

If you drive or rent a car, put your car in a lot or garage and leave it there unless you are traveling away from downtown. You don’t need a car to get around in the French Quarter, Central Business District, or Warehouse District. Also, the parking regulations are Byzantine and there are lots of "parking control agents".

The regional transit authority (www.norta.com) sells 1 and 3 day passes that offer unlimited use of buses and streetcars for the day(s) you select.

There is always music, but the bands change: Go to www.bestofneworleans.com and click on Music then Listings or to www.offbeat.com and click on Listings, then Music.

Wander around the French Quarter, enjoy the architecture, watch the street entertainers (do tip), and visit some of the historic buildings that have been turned into museums. Most of them charge admission but some are free (go to www.frenchquarter.com and click on Historic Attractions).

Assuming the weather is nice, you can collect a sandwich lunch and eat in the riverfront park (watch the shipping) or in Jackson Square (a very nice park).

The Riverwalk shopping center has a food court with dining overlooking the river (www.riverwalkmarketplace.com)…

Cafe du Monde is in the French Quarter and you shouldn’t miss having cafe au lait & beignets (www.cafedumonde.com). Another great coffee shop is the Croissant d’Or (at 615 Ursulines Street), which is open from 7:00am to 2:00pm and has food other than pastry.

There is a free ferry across the Mississippi at the "foot" of Canal Street. It is a short trip but like a harbor cruise w/o a guide.

The Aquarium and Audubon Zoo are world-class attractions (www.auduboninstitute.org) and you should see them if you can. There is a shuttle boat (not free) between the Aquarium (which is next to the French Quarter) and the Zoo (which is several miles away). You can also drive to the Zoo (which has free parking) or take public transit from the French Quarter.

New Orleans is home to a number of other museums, such as the National World War II Museum (www.ddaymuseum.org) and the New Orleans Museum of Art (www.noma.org). Both can be reached by public transit: The WWII museum is in the central business district but a long walk from the French Quarter and NOMA is not within walking distance of downtown but has free parking if you choose to drive there…

Crime tends to become a topic in questions about New Orleans. Use the same common sense you need in every major city in the world and there is little chance you will be a victim of anything except a need to visit the gym: Pay attention to your surroundings. Stay away from anywhere dark & deserted. Pay attention to your feelings – if anyone or anywhere gives you a bad feeling, leave the area. Don’t leave something like a camera-bag or backpack unattended on a park bench while you wander off to take photos. Etc.

Hope you have a good visit!


I’m going to New Orleans, Biloxi, Mobile shortly. What attractions are left and active after Katrina?


the only thing to view in Biloxi is the distruction. New Orleans.. there is still many things to do.. for Valentines day my boyfriend and i went on a River Boat Cruise with breakfest and a jazz band. In the afternoon i went on a Garden District tour. Viewing the million dollar homes of famous celebrates .. such as john goodman to name one. then at night a hanuted ghost tour. The Garden and the Ghost tours were givin by Rev Zombies Voodoo Shop. It was great and they did a very good job. I’m from New Orleans and been to many other cities.. and new orleans offers many things the no others have. so its a great time to experience the culture of new orleans when down here.

you can go to neworleans.com click on ‘Local Guides’ then ‘Tours’ most of them are running. and theres and endless list of them.

HAVE FUN
and enjoy .. THE SPIRIT OF NEW ORLEANS


how is new orleans?Current residents or tourists please?

How is post-katrina new orleans? Can anyone tell me about the damage there? My husband and I want to come for mardi gras.Is the whole city under the curfew or just badly damaged parts?the media hasn’t really talked about. What tourism attractions are closed/open and which ones are good to see?

New Orleans is healing, some parts quicker than others. By Mardi-Gras, most of the tourist-y type places should be operational. (The zoo is open, the acquarium won’t be for quite a while, the D-day museum is trying to re-open ASAP, the cable cars are operational.)

The curfew was lifted last month, but there is still a very visual National Guard presence. I actually feel safer in NO than I have in years. The streets are less crowded now than they were last year at this time.

The biggest problem most neighborhoods in NO is having is lack of employees. Most grocery stores are closing around 7 or 8 because they just don’t have anyone to work the late shift. Of course, the french quarter and Bourbon Street are mostly open, and don’t close early. (There are a few bars, restaurants, and shops that haven’t re-opened – maybe 1/4 of them total.)

As far as the heavily damaged areas, they weren’t tourist attractions. They were residential areas, ones that the general public doesn’t have full access to yet.

So come to New Orleans! Our financial success is largely dependent on tourism. Oh, and definately make reservations today. A lot of the hotel/motels are housing insurance adjustors and construction crews. Availability is limited.

Regarding the guy who suggested you go to Opelousas: he’s right in that the Opelousas, Chataignier, Ville Platte Mardi Gras celebrations are more true to the original intent of the holiday. They’re more country, less tourist-y, just as much alcohol, fewer breasts. If that’s what you’re looking for, go on over there. Just don’t expect New Orleans style Mardi Gras. And realize that it’s a 2.5 – 3 hour drive from NO.


“Beads & Bourbon Street” Episode 23 – The Lee Burnette Show

Lee heads to New Orleans and the craziness ensues on Bourbon Street!

Duration : 0:8:37

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Outrageous places to visit in New Orleans besides Bourbon Street?

New Orleans

New Orleans

Things To Do In New Orleans

Visiting New Orleans for the first time. Going during the French Quarter Festival……anything we have to do or see besides Bourbon Street? Anything out of the norm we should check out within an hours travel distance from New Orleans?

 

Things to do in New Orleans:

 

Mardi Gras and the Jazz Festival are world famous events, but New Orleans hosts many festivals and celebrations throughout the year: www.nola.com/festivals

The Saint Charles Streetcar is the oldest continuously operating street railway in the world and is a “tourist attraction” in its own right. It is part of the public transit system, as are the Canal Street and Riverfront streetcar lines: www.norta.com

There is always music, but the bands change: Go to www.bestofneworleans.com and click on Music then Listings or to www.offbeat.com and click on Listings, then Music.

Note that music clubs often advertise “No Cover”, meaning there is no charge for entering. However, clubs with “No Cover” often require that customers buy a beverage each for every “set ” of music (which can be every 20 minutes) so KNOW THE PRICE before you sit down. Clubs do that because some people will sit in the club all evening drinking nothing (clubs only make money from the drinks they sell – not from the music). It is also a good idea to pay for each round of drinks (in clubs on Bourbon Street) as it is delivered so there can’t be any confusion at the end of the evening.

An incomplete guide to bars & clubs: www.neworleanscheapdrinks.com

About certain alcoholic beverages: Realize that some famous drinks are VERY potent compared with regular cocktails that have only 1 to 1 ½ ounces of alcohol. For example, a Hurricane is basically 3 or 4 ounces of rum in something like red Kool-Aid, and a Hand Grenade has at least 4 ½ ounces of Everclear + rum + vodka mixed with melon liquor. They don’t necessarily taste like an alcoholic beverage and it is easy to over-indulge.

Wander around the French Quarter, enjoy the architecture, watch the street entertainers (do tip), and visit some of the historic buildings that have been turned into museums (go to www.frenchquarter.com and click on Historic Attractions).

Assuming the weather is good, you can collect a sandwich lunch and eat in the riverfront park (watch the shipping) or in Jackson Square (a very nice park).

The Riverwalk shopping center has an air-conditioned food court with dining overlooking the river (www.riverwalkmarketplace.com). The Canal Place shopping center is in the French Quarter and has a cinema and higher-end shopping (Saks 5th Avenue, Brooks Brothers, etc.). Magazine Street is a miles-long shopping district: www.magazinestreet.com

Louisiana is the only US state that offers tax-free shopping for international visitors: http://www.louisianataxfree.com/

The lobby for the Westin Canal Place Hotel is on the 11th floor and overlooks the French Quarter. It is a great place for an afternoon drink/snack:(www.westin.com).

Cafe du Monde is in the French Quarter and you shouldn’t miss having cafe au lait & beignets (www.cafedumonde.com). Another great coffee shop is the Croissant d’Or (at 615 Ursulines Street), which is open from 7:00am to 2:00pm and has food in addition to pastry.

The Palm Court restaurant is very nice, has moderate prices, and offers traditional live jazz starting at 8:00pm: 1204 Decatur Street, tel 504-525-0200 (reservations are important and they are not open every day). The Palm Court is closed from about July 25th to about September 25th each year.

Maximo’s Italian Grill has great food and atmosphere: 1117 Decatur Street in the French Quarter, (504) 586-8883.

All of the famous restaurants (Antoine’s, Arnaud’s, Brennan’s, Commander’s Palace, etc.) have reopened. The Pelican Club (on Exchange Alley in the FQ) is not as well known but is the same type experience. Reservations are a good idea, and probably essential on weekends. Tujaques Restaurant (823 Decatur Street) is very traditional and has moderate prices: www.tujaguesrestaurant.com

Cafe Degas is a very French restaurant near City Park at 3127 Esplanade – which is not within walking distance of downtown (5 to 10 minutes by taxi). They are closed on Mondays & Tuesdays (504-945-5635).

The Napoleon House restaurant is at 500 Chartres Street in the FQ, and has a menu of great local dishes: www.napoleonhouse.com

Preservation Hall has traditional live Jazz, and doesn’t serve alcohol so all ages are welcome: www.preservationhall.com

New Orleans has ballet, opera, a symphony orchestra, and theatre:

www.nobadance.com
www.neworleansopera.org
www.lpomusic.com
www.lepetittheatre.com

There is a free ferry across the Mississippi at the “foot” of Canal Street. It is a short trip but like a harbor cruise w/o a guide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/canal_street_ferry

The Aquarium, Audubon Zoo, and the new Insectarium are world-class attractions (www.auduboninstitute.org) and you should see them if you can. The Zoo is several miles from downtown. You can drive to the Zoo (which has free parking) or take public transit from the French Quarter.

The Louisiana State Museum is in the French Quarter: http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/ New Orleans is also home to a number of other museums, such as the National World War II Museum (www.ddaymuseum.org) and the New Orleans Museum of Art (www.noma.org). Both can be reached by public transit: The WWII museum is in the central business district but a long walk from the French Quarter. NOMA is not within walking distance of downtown but has free parking. Go to www.neworleansmuseums.com for info on more museums.

Harrah’s Casino is in the Central Business District: www.harrahs.com (age 21 required for entry)

New Orleans City Park has a variety of attractions + free parking. (www.neworleanscitypark.com).

Check www.frenchquarter.com and http://www.nola.com/visitor/ for ideas about other things to do.

Hope you have a great time in the city of New Orleans!

 

New Orleans


Wyndham Avenue Plaza Resort-Celebrate Mardi Gras Stay in New Orleans Hotel near Bourbon Street

BOOK NOW: http://www.avenueplazaresort.com/?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=Link&utm_campaign=YouTube_Avenue_Plaza_Resort

Wyndham’s Avenue Plaza Resort hotel keeps you close to all the New Orleans excitement but away from most of the crowds and commotion. Youll stay in a quieter area of the city that’s only minutes from the popular French Quarter. With on-site concierge service available to you, you’ll find an endless playground in “The Big Easy – world-famous for jazz music, great restaurants, fabulous shopping and unique attractions.

Avenue Plaza Resort, located in the picturesque Garden District off St. Charles Avenue, offers studios and one-bedroom beautifully furnished suites with fully-equipped kitchenettes. Experience the outdoor courtyard swimming pool, with jetted soaking tub attached, on the landing to “The Ashley House,” an antebellum home that is owned by the resort. Visit the resorts rooftop sun deck to enjoy a spectacular view of the city. If youre interested in a juicy steak, fresh seafood or gumbo, Mr. Johns restaurant, located in the lobby, really hits the spot.

Duration : 0:0:32

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What Mardi Gras parade happens first in the French Quarter?

My friends and I want to hit an earlier parade, and one that happens in the quarter. Any ideas or recommendations?

The first answer is correct and none of the traditional Mardi Gras parades have traveled through the French Quarter since the 1960s.

However, the Krewe du Vieux is a parade (with small floats) that goes throught the FQ about 2 weeks before Mardi Gras Day:

http://www.kreweduvieux.org/

A good place to watch the K du V parade is from the balcony of Margaritaville on Decatur Street:

http://www.margaritaville.com/index.php?page=cafe_no

Go to http://www.mardigras.com/ for more info on Mardi Gras in New Orleans. The FAQ section can be very informative.

Hope you have a great time!


New Orleans?

I want to visit Nola in a month for a anniversery and I want to make sure it’s up and running so it would be worth my time. Also, any attractions/restaurants that I should experience? Thanks

I was there in November and yes, it is up and running! The people is warm and nice, and the food is wonderful. I was there on a convention, so I did not have too much time to tour around, but the French Quarter is beautiful and it was not affected by the hurricane. Have fun and support Nola!


Wyndham La Belle Maison for Jazz Festival and New Orleans Saints Vacation

BOOK NOW: http://www.extraholidays.com
Brand-New Stay with Big Easy Spirit. Youll really feel the heart and soul of the Crescent City at the new Wyndham La Belle Maison, located on Gravier Street in the famous Warehouse District, two blocks from the French Quarter. This original Franklin Printing Company landmark will be meticulously restored to assure you a delightful downtown stay, including an eight-story skylight atrium centerpiece, historic Crescent City décor, on-site amenities and much more.

Great care has been taken to preserve the rich architectural style of the famous New Orleans Warehouse District. Creature comforts include our outdoor saltwater spa, as well as indoor delights ranging from vigorous workout area to a relaxing sauna and indoor spa. The resort is just one block from historic Canal Street where the French Quarter awaits to enliven your senses 24 hours a day, providing ample shopping and restaurant choices.

In New Orleans and the French Quarter, the attractions, sights, sounds, activities, food and restaurants and entertainment for visitors are limitless. The French Quarter is the destination for most tourists, and Jackson Square is the heart of the French Quarter, with artists, museums and historical buildings and the Moon Walk, providing a breath-taking view of the Mississippi River. Find information about Mardi Gras, The Jazz & Heritage Festival (Jazz Fest), the Spring Fiesta, riverboat cruises, the French Quarter Festival, Christmas in the Oaks at City Park, and of course, New Year’s Eve at Jackson Square And, at night, the streets are alive with people taking in all of the jazz and music clubs, not to mention Bourbon Street.

Duration : 0:0:31

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