Posts tagged "Louisiana"

New Orleans’ Jazz Still Hurt, Inspired by Katrina

Jeffrey Brown has an update on musician Michael White who continues his effort to keep a musical tradition strong, five years after Katrina.

Duration : 0:5:20

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What’s an easy recipe for Bourbon street chicken?


Bourbon Street Chicken

4 chicken breasts
1 tsp. ground ginger
1/4 C. soy sauce
2 tablespoons dried minced onion
1/2 C. packed brown sugar
1/4 C. bourbon (to taste)
1/2 tsp. garlic powder

Place chicken breasts in a 9×13" baking dish

Combine the ginger, soy sauce, onion flakes, sugar, bourbon and garlic powder and pour over chicken

Cover dish and place in refrigerator overnight

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F

In a covered dish, bake in preheated oven, basting frequently, for 1 hour or until chicken is well browned and juices run clear. Also good on the grill!

Note: If you double the recipe, make sure that the chicken is still in a single layer.


Things to do in New Orleans for the under 18 crowd(im17)?

I’ll be going down there in March and im looking for things to do while my rents are out doing whatever.
Any Clubs, attractions, anything for the under 18 crowd

Things a teenager can do in New Orleans:

Mardi Gras and the Jazz Festival are world famous events, but New Orleans hosts many festivals and celebrations throughout the year: www.nola.com/festivals

The Saint Charles Streetcar is the oldest continuously operating street railway in the world and is a "tourist attraction" in its own right. It is part of the public transit system, as are the Canal Street and Riverfront streetcar lines: www.norta.com

Wander around the French Quarter, enjoy the architecture, watch the street entertainers (do tip), and visit some of the historic buildings that have been turned into museums (go to www.frenchquarter.com and click on Historic Attractions).

Assuming the weather is good, you can collect a sandwich lunch and eat in the riverfront park (watch the shipping) or in Jackson Square (a very nice park).

The Riverwalk shopping center has an air-conditioned food court with dining overlooking the river (www.riverwalkmarketplace.com). The Canal Place shopping center is in the French Quarter and has a cinema and higher-end shopping (Saks 5th Avenue, Brooks Brothers, etc.). Magazine Street is a miles-long shopping district: www.magazinestreet.com

The lobby for the Westin Canal Place Hotel is on the 11th floor and overlooks the French Quarter. It is a great place for an afternoon drink/snack:(www.westin.com).

Cafe du Monde is in the French Quarter and you shouldn’t miss having cafe au lait & beignets (www.cafedumonde.com). Another great coffee shop is the Croissant d’Or (at 615 Ursulines Street), which is open from 7:00am to 2:00pm and has food in addition to pastry.

The Palm Court restaurant is very nice, has moderate prices, and offers traditional live jazz starting at 8:00pm: 1204 Decatur Street, tel 504-525-0200 (reservations are important and they are not open every day). The Palm Court is closed from about July 25th to about September 25th each year.

Maximo’s Italian Grill has great food and atmosphere: 1117 Decatur Street in the French Quarter, (504) 586-8883.

All of the famous restaurants (Antoine’s, Arnaud’s, Brennan’s, Commander’s Palace, etc.) have reopened. The Pelican Club (on Exchange Alley in the FQ) is not as well known but is the same type experience. Reservations are a good idea, and probably essential on weekends. Tujaques Restaurant (823 Decatur Street) is very traditional and has moderate prices: www.tujaguesrestaurant.com

Cafe Degas is a very French restaurant near City Park at 3127 Esplanade – which is not within walking distance of downtown (5 to 10 minutes by taxi). They are closed on Mondays & Tuesdays (504-945-5635).

The Napoleon House restaurant is at 500 Chartres Street in the FQ, and has a menu of great local dishes: www.napoleonhouse.com

Preservation Hall has traditional live Jazz, and doesn’t serve alcohol so all ages are welcome: www.preservationhall.com

New Orleans has ballet, opera, a symphony orchestra, and theatre:

www.nobadance.com
www.neworleansopera.org
www.lpomusic.com
www.lepetittheatre.com

There is a free ferry across the Mississippi at the "foot" of Canal Street. It is a short trip but like a harbor cruise w/o a guide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/canal_street_ferry

The Aquarium, Audubon Zoo, and the new Insectarium are world-class attractions (www.auduboninstitute.org) and you should see them if you can. The Zoo is several miles from downtown. You can drive to the Zoo (which has free parking) or take public transit from the French Quarter.

The Louisiana State Museum is in the French Quarter: http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/ New Orleans is also home to a number of other museums, such as the National World War II Museum (www.ddaymuseum.org) and the New Orleans Museum of Art (www.noma.org). Both can be reached by public transit: The WWII museum is in the central business district but a long walk from the French Quarter. NOMA is not within walking distance of downtown but has free parking. Go to www.neworleansmuseums.com for info on more museums.

New Orleans City Park has a variety of attractions + free parking. (www.neworleanscitypark.com).

Check www.frenchquarter.com and http://www.nola.com/visitor/ for ideas about other things to do.

Hope you have a great time!


Treme: Beyond Bourbon Street (HBO)

Explore the diverse cultures, traditions, music and food of New Orleans in this in-depth look at the new HBO drama series “Treme.” For more information, log onto HBO.com.

Duration : 0:29:7

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HEAVY BRASS Part One

A silent musical comedy from New Orleans. . . if you can imagine that.

Duration : 7 min 35 sec

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Barack Obama in New Orleans, LA

Barack addressed a crowd of 3,500 supporters at Tulane University on February 7, 2008.

Duration : 0:7:46

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What to do in New Orleans? Metairie safe & close to French-Q?

I am going during the Essence music festival. If you are from N.O. or have visited please give me your opinion on the best resturants, ferries boats, bars, club, attractions, etc. Don’t forget a safe place to stay and parking advice thanks!

Metairie is NOT close to the French Quarte – it is a mostly middle class suburb to the west of the city. Metairie was damaged by Katrina but did not suffer the really extensive flooding that devastated New Orleans so it has almost fully recovered.

Katrina flooded about 80% of New Orleans with salt water, and the water stayed for almost a month. Much of the city is still struggling to recover and all you have to do to see devastation is drive around. It will take years for NOLA to fully recover from Katrina.

However, the parts of the city that tourists usually visit were not flooded. It’s not a coincidence – the French Quarter and other old parts of the city were built on relatively high ground and only suffered wind damage from Katrina. Almost all of the damage has been repaired and you have to look closely in the FQ or city center to see that Katrina happened at all.

If you drive or rent a car, put your car in a lot or garage and leave it there unless you are traveling away from downtown. You don’t need a car to get around in the French Quarter, Central Business District, or Warehouse District. Also, the parking regulations are Byzantine and there are lots of "parking control agents".

The regional transit authority (www.norta.com) sells 1 and 3 day passes that offer unlimited use of buses and streetcars for the day(s) you select.

There is always music, but the bands change: Go to www.bestofneworleans.com and click on Music then Listings or to www.offbeat.com and click on Listings, then Music.

Wander around the French Quarter, enjoy the architecture, watch the street entertainers (do tip), and visit some of the historic buildings that have been turned into museums. Most of them charge admission but some are free (go to www.frenchquarter.com and click on Historic Attractions).

Assuming the weather is nice, you can collect a sandwich lunch and eat in the riverfront park (watch the shipping) or in Jackson Square (a very nice park).

The Riverwalk shopping center has a food court with dining overlooking the river (www.riverwalkmarketplace.com)…

Cafe du Monde is in the French Quarter and you shouldn’t miss having cafe au lait & beignets (www.cafedumonde.com). Another great coffee shop is the Croissant d’Or (at 615 Ursulines Street), which is open from 7:00am to 2:00pm and has food other than pastry.

There is a free ferry across the Mississippi at the "foot" of Canal Street. It is a short trip but like a harbor cruise w/o a guide.

The Aquarium and Audubon Zoo are world-class attractions (www.auduboninstitute.org) and you should see them if you can. There is a shuttle boat (not free) between the Aquarium (which is next to the French Quarter) and the Zoo (which is several miles away). You can also drive to the Zoo (which has free parking) or take public transit from the French Quarter.

New Orleans is home to a number of other museums, such as the National World War II Museum (www.ddaymuseum.org) and the New Orleans Museum of Art (www.noma.org). Both can be reached by public transit: The WWII museum is in the central business district but a long walk from the French Quarter and NOMA is not within walking distance of downtown but has free parking if you choose to drive there…

Crime tends to become a topic in questions about New Orleans. Use the same common sense you need in every major city in the world and there is little chance you will be a victim of anything except a need to visit the gym: Pay attention to your surroundings. Stay away from anywhere dark & deserted. Pay attention to your feelings – if anyone or anywhere gives you a bad feeling, leave the area. Don’t leave something like a camera-bag or backpack unattended on a park bench while you wander off to take photos. Etc.

Hope you have a good visit!


hank III in nola

hank williams III

Duration : 0:10:16

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how is new orleans?Current residents or tourists please?

How is post-katrina new orleans? Can anyone tell me about the damage there? My husband and I want to come for mardi gras.Is the whole city under the curfew or just badly damaged parts?the media hasn’t really talked about. What tourism attractions are closed/open and which ones are good to see?

New Orleans is healing, some parts quicker than others. By Mardi-Gras, most of the tourist-y type places should be operational. (The zoo is open, the acquarium won’t be for quite a while, the D-day museum is trying to re-open ASAP, the cable cars are operational.)

The curfew was lifted last month, but there is still a very visual National Guard presence. I actually feel safer in NO than I have in years. The streets are less crowded now than they were last year at this time.

The biggest problem most neighborhoods in NO is having is lack of employees. Most grocery stores are closing around 7 or 8 because they just don’t have anyone to work the late shift. Of course, the french quarter and Bourbon Street are mostly open, and don’t close early. (There are a few bars, restaurants, and shops that haven’t re-opened – maybe 1/4 of them total.)

As far as the heavily damaged areas, they weren’t tourist attractions. They were residential areas, ones that the general public doesn’t have full access to yet.

So come to New Orleans! Our financial success is largely dependent on tourism. Oh, and definately make reservations today. A lot of the hotel/motels are housing insurance adjustors and construction crews. Availability is limited.

Regarding the guy who suggested you go to Opelousas: he’s right in that the Opelousas, Chataignier, Ville Platte Mardi Gras celebrations are more true to the original intent of the holiday. They’re more country, less tourist-y, just as much alcohol, fewer breasts. If that’s what you’re looking for, go on over there. Just don’t expect New Orleans style Mardi Gras. And realize that it’s a 2.5 – 3 hour drive from NO.


SECRET NEW ORLEANS: TJ & Di w/Miss Marion Colbert of Tremé!

VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL! (series) episode #2! TJ Fisher and Di Harris adventures! Miss Marion demonstrates her New Orleanian attitude and bounce-back approach to life to TJ and Di: Shake the devil off your back! The secret wisdom for proper second-lining, survival, happiness in the moment and longevity. Miss Marion is a lifelong parishioner of St. Augustine Catholic Church, the oldest African-American Catholic parish in the country, the cornerstone of the city’s jazz music and second-line parade traditions. Miss Marion’s church has historical connections to nearby Congo Square.

At age 82, Creole lady Miss Marion remains the spirited queen of Jazz Funeral second lining, rejoicing and dancing back from the grave. Her effervescent spirit and magic were captured on film Easter Sunday — during her regular work day, with a little dancing weaved in amid her normal-routine duties and responsibilities.This clip was filmed onsite in the ladies’ restroom of the elegant and famed French Quarter Brennan’s Restaurant. (Audible toilets flush in the background.) Miss Marion has served as the establishment’s beloved washroom attendant for four decades, and she walks to work from her historical Tremé neighborhood.

Miss Marion is a living example of New Orleans ability to recover post-disaster, to triumph over sorrow, through a belief in, and a living testament, to the power of faith, hope, prayer, worship, music, dance, courage, collective memory, history, cultural identify, local customs and religious heritage.

Miss Marion says, “What’s life? Life is what you make it. A smile goes a long way.”

Miss Marion poignantly and proudly reveals her wisdom — the counsel of Father Jerome LeDoux, a beloved Afro-American priest — in post-Katrina New Orleans. During storm, Miss Marion lost her home and stayed with the masses at the New Orleans Saints Louisiana Superdome; post-Katrina her beloved grandsons Damon Brooks, 16, and Ivan Brooks, 17, were murdered in 2007 the 9th Ward. Her story was profiled in The New Yorker (New Orleans Journal) and elsewhere.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/neworleansjournal/2007/02/

http://blog.nola.com/tpcrimearchive/2007/03/a_communitys_loss.html.

Despite breathtaking losses, Miss Marion perseveres and enjoys life, with a smile, joy and celebration, as she continues to take her own advice.

Miss Marion played herself in the Peter Entell documentary, Shake the Devil Off.

http://jsr.fsu.edu/Katrina/Johnson.htm

Miss Marion dances on video with VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL! (series) mischief-making provocateurs TJ Fisher and Di Harris!

Quirky French Quarter author/Bourbon Street resident TJ Fisher and style maven/artist Di Harris carve a unique niché among New Orleans eccentric notables and flamboyant characters. TJ previous dedicated an original New Orleans-based 2008 nonfiction book to Miss Marion.

TJ and Di are known for their offbeat sense of satire and signature panache — adventuresome hijinks, biting wit, high-octane passion and theatrical style. TJ drives a ’59 pink Caddy convertible named Lulabell, and Di rides a 1968 “My Fair Lady” model banana-seat Stingray. TJ is the accolade-winning author of multiple works of New Orleans-based nonfiction and fiction. Award-winning designer Di is the proprietor of where the stars shop, Zogwald’s of the French Quarter, an ever popular and famed international boutique. (TJ also maintains a home in Palm Beach, Florida and Di in Melbourne, Australia.)

See outrageous Sandcastle Queen TJ Fisher and her idiosyncratic friend and partner in shenanigans Lady Marigny Di Harris in additional Tanzmanianmudbug YouTube postings: http://www.youtube.com/user/Tanzmanianmudbug.

See more about TJ at:

http://www.tjfisher.com

http://www.tjfisher.net

The vintage-style clip of Miss Marion (an afternoon in the life of TJ and Di, and their intriguingly surreal real world) ends with unforgettable imagery of Miss Marion in motion. Miss Marion regularly doles out her inspirational secrets of life and pearls of wisdom to, and is beloved by, an endless parade of superstars, luminaries, VIPs, ladies of society, the wealthy and the not-so-wealthy, common folks.

The duality of New Orleans and French Quarter life seems extreme. Here the unlikely happens frequently; ironic situations and chance meetings are an everyday occurrence. In New Orleans, history is not merely something observed from afar by leafing through the pages of textbooks. The rich cultural heritage of the city’s forebears still shapes, pervades and surrounds daily life. Here the band plays on, and life goes on. Joie de vivre.

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HBO and David Simon’s lush new drama series Treme “gets” New Orleans, they definitely get it, do you? Do you get the resilient heart, soul, spirit and humor of the people and places of New Orleans…?

DO YOU KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO MISS NEW ORLEANS?

Duration : 0:2:14

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