Posts tagged "Louisiana"

Sticky: The Train They Call The City of New Orleans

 We have all heard one version or another of the song “The City of New Orleans”.  The song performed by the likes of Arlo Guthrie, Willie Nelson and John Denver was actually written by Steve Goodman about riding the rails in an observation car.
 
I knew the song but had never ridden a train, much less a renowned Pullman, so you can imagine my excitement when I had the opportunity to do just that.  My husband was invited to a business function being held on the railcar, and spouses were included.  Think Jim West and Artemis Gordon’s ‘rail-ride” on Wild, Wild West, but better.

Built in 1927 by the illustrious Pullman Company, The City of New Orleans parlor observation railcar is used primarily for charitable auctions and business-related meetings supporting New Orleans-area commerce and business development.  Acquired by Gregory Dodd and relocated to New Orleans in 1998, the railcar had had a long and colorful life that spanned states and rail companies.  In 2002 the New Orleans Public Belt Railroad acquired and renamed it The City of New Orleans.   
 
The railcar has raised over $800,000.00 for local charities since its renovation in 2002.  Accommodations include seating for up to 20 persons and full service catering capabilities for both food and beverage. Our group included 40 people so they hitched on a second car, The Louisiana.  

Plush club chairs, beautiful brass appointments, wood wainscoting and marble ledges were only topped by the food-laden waiter and bartender at our beck and call. The 3 hour route took us from the rail yard in Metairie, to the top of the Huey P. Long Bridge, all along the river to the French Quarter and even slightly past the curve of the river beyond the French Market which is a restricted area.  The view looking back on the city is amazing! 

Take an unforgettable ride on The Train They Call the City of New Orleans.  All Aboard!! 
 

by Sharon Denise Talbot
For more information on how to hitch a ride on The City of New Orleans see the following website:

http://www.nopb.com/nopb/about-us/community-involvement-3.html


Hurricane Katrina New Orleans, 08/29/2005 Pre Dawn Video.

On 08/29/2005 I was in downtown New Orleans on assignment for The Weather Channel and I was the freelance videographer “Weather Paparazzi” who stayed in the city to document the storm while everyone else evacuated the area. This footage was shot during the pre dawn hours as hurricane Katrina started to rip apart the city. I shot this on Canal Street and in the French Quarter. The video shows the city losing power as well as the start of the flooding from the heavy rain and damage. I was the only one out in the storm shooting video and getting blasted by the deadly flying debris. This is part of the BNVN Weather Paparazzi stock video collection. Visit www.WeatherPaparazzi.com for more information and stock video license rates.

Duration : 0:7:51

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Things to do in New Orleans for the under 18 crowd(im17)?

I’ll be going down there in March and im looking for things to do while my rents are out doing whatever.
Any Clubs, attractions, anything for the under 18 crowd

Things a teenager can do in New Orleans:

Mardi Gras and the Jazz Festival are world famous events, but New Orleans hosts many festivals and celebrations throughout the year: www.nola.com/festivals

The Saint Charles Streetcar is the oldest continuously operating street railway in the world and is a "tourist attraction" in its own right. It is part of the public transit system, as are the Canal Street and Riverfront streetcar lines: www.norta.com

Wander around the French Quarter, enjoy the architecture, watch the street entertainers (do tip), and visit some of the historic buildings that have been turned into museums (go to www.frenchquarter.com and click on Historic Attractions).

Assuming the weather is good, you can collect a sandwich lunch and eat in the riverfront park (watch the shipping) or in Jackson Square (a very nice park).

The Riverwalk shopping center has an air-conditioned food court with dining overlooking the river (www.riverwalkmarketplace.com). The Canal Place shopping center is in the French Quarter and has a cinema and higher-end shopping (Saks 5th Avenue, Brooks Brothers, etc.). Magazine Street is a miles-long shopping district: www.magazinestreet.com

The lobby for the Westin Canal Place Hotel is on the 11th floor and overlooks the French Quarter. It is a great place for an afternoon drink/snack:(www.westin.com).

Cafe du Monde is in the French Quarter and you shouldn’t miss having cafe au lait & beignets (www.cafedumonde.com). Another great coffee shop is the Croissant d’Or (at 615 Ursulines Street), which is open from 7:00am to 2:00pm and has food in addition to pastry.

The Palm Court restaurant is very nice, has moderate prices, and offers traditional live jazz starting at 8:00pm: 1204 Decatur Street, tel 504-525-0200 (reservations are important and they are not open every day). The Palm Court is closed from about July 25th to about September 25th each year.

Maximo’s Italian Grill has great food and atmosphere: 1117 Decatur Street in the French Quarter, (504) 586-8883.

All of the famous restaurants (Antoine’s, Arnaud’s, Brennan’s, Commander’s Palace, etc.) have reopened. The Pelican Club (on Exchange Alley in the FQ) is not as well known but is the same type experience. Reservations are a good idea, and probably essential on weekends. Tujaques Restaurant (823 Decatur Street) is very traditional and has moderate prices: www.tujaguesrestaurant.com

Cafe Degas is a very French restaurant near City Park at 3127 Esplanade – which is not within walking distance of downtown (5 to 10 minutes by taxi). They are closed on Mondays & Tuesdays (504-945-5635).

The Napoleon House restaurant is at 500 Chartres Street in the FQ, and has a menu of great local dishes: www.napoleonhouse.com

Preservation Hall has traditional live Jazz, and doesn’t serve alcohol so all ages are welcome: www.preservationhall.com

New Orleans has ballet, opera, a symphony orchestra, and theatre:

www.nobadance.com
www.neworleansopera.org
www.lpomusic.com
www.lepetittheatre.com

There is a free ferry across the Mississippi at the "foot" of Canal Street. It is a short trip but like a harbor cruise w/o a guide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/canal_street_ferry

The Aquarium, Audubon Zoo, and the new Insectarium are world-class attractions (www.auduboninstitute.org) and you should see them if you can. The Zoo is several miles from downtown. You can drive to the Zoo (which has free parking) or take public transit from the French Quarter.

The Louisiana State Museum is in the French Quarter: http://lsm.crt.state.la.us/ New Orleans is also home to a number of other museums, such as the National World War II Museum (www.ddaymuseum.org) and the New Orleans Museum of Art (www.noma.org). Both can be reached by public transit: The WWII museum is in the central business district but a long walk from the French Quarter. NOMA is not within walking distance of downtown but has free parking. Go to www.neworleansmuseums.com for info on more museums.

New Orleans City Park has a variety of attractions + free parking. (www.neworleanscitypark.com).

Check www.frenchquarter.com and http://www.nola.com/visitor/ for ideas about other things to do.

Hope you have a great time!


Residents Voice Opinions On Master Plan

People living in New Orleans City Council District B come together to talk about the future of their neighborhood — but it’s the same issue that keeps tearing them apart.

Duration : 0:1:52

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Gutterpunks: New Orleans Homeless Street Youth – PRE Katrina

Reporter Tim Estiloz visited New Orleans in this 1997 story about a group of homeless youth – dubbed by some in the city as “Gutterpunks”. Estiloz spent several days with this group of disaffected and indigent young people – many of whom willingly chose to live on the hard – sometimes dangerous, streets of “Pre-Katrina” New Orleans.

Most of these kids lived “day to day” begging for food and money. Some lived in deplorable conditions near the popular French Quarter… unimaginable in the years before Katrina. Estiloz gained the trust of many of these kids… who allowed Estiloz to follow them, interview them and show their difficult life on the streets – an existence that some city administrators and business people in New Orleans frown upon. This is a uniquely candid and sad window into a homeless youth underclass in New Orleans that existed well before Katrina… and also still exists today.

This story was written and produced by Tim Estiloz – who now reports on entertainment for CN8 – The Comcast Network.

See more of Tim’s videos on You Tube on his channel “FilmFanTV”… and be sure to subscribe.

Be sure to visit Tim’s website: www.TimEstiloz.com
http://www.timestiloz.com/Site/Home.html

Duration : 0:7:44

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SECRET NEW ORLEANS: TJ & Di w/Miss Marion Colbert of Tremé!

VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL! (series) episode #2! TJ Fisher and Di Harris adventures! Miss Marion demonstrates her New Orleanian attitude and bounce-back approach to life to TJ and Di: Shake the devil off your back! The secret wisdom for proper second-lining, survival, happiness in the moment and longevity. Miss Marion is a lifelong parishioner of St. Augustine Catholic Church, the oldest African-American Catholic parish in the country, the cornerstone of the city’s jazz music and second-line parade traditions. Miss Marion’s church has historical connections to nearby Congo Square.

At age 82, Creole lady Miss Marion remains the spirited queen of Jazz Funeral second lining, rejoicing and dancing back from the grave. Her effervescent spirit and magic were captured on film Easter Sunday — during her regular work day, with a little dancing weaved in amid her normal-routine duties and responsibilities.This clip was filmed onsite in the ladies’ restroom of the elegant and famed French Quarter Brennan’s Restaurant. (Audible toilets flush in the background.) Miss Marion has served as the establishment’s beloved washroom attendant for four decades, and she walks to work from her historical Tremé neighborhood.

Miss Marion is a living example of New Orleans ability to recover post-disaster, to triumph over sorrow, through a belief in, and a living testament, to the power of faith, hope, prayer, worship, music, dance, courage, collective memory, history, cultural identify, local customs and religious heritage.

Miss Marion says, “What’s life? Life is what you make it. A smile goes a long way.”

Miss Marion poignantly and proudly reveals her wisdom — the counsel of Father Jerome LeDoux, a beloved Afro-American priest — in post-Katrina New Orleans. During storm, Miss Marion lost her home and stayed with the masses at the New Orleans Saints Louisiana Superdome; post-Katrina her beloved grandsons Damon Brooks, 16, and Ivan Brooks, 17, were murdered in 2007 the 9th Ward. Her story was profiled in The New Yorker (New Orleans Journal) and elsewhere.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/neworleansjournal/2007/02/

http://blog.nola.com/tpcrimearchive/2007/03/a_communitys_loss.html.

Despite breathtaking losses, Miss Marion perseveres and enjoys life, with a smile, joy and celebration, as she continues to take her own advice.

Miss Marion played herself in the Peter Entell documentary, Shake the Devil Off.

http://jsr.fsu.edu/Katrina/Johnson.htm

Miss Marion dances on video with VIEUX CARRÉ CONFIDENTIAL! (series) mischief-making provocateurs TJ Fisher and Di Harris!

Quirky French Quarter author/Bourbon Street resident TJ Fisher and style maven/artist Di Harris carve a unique niché among New Orleans eccentric notables and flamboyant characters. TJ previous dedicated an original New Orleans-based 2008 nonfiction book to Miss Marion.

TJ and Di are known for their offbeat sense of satire and signature panache — adventuresome hijinks, biting wit, high-octane passion and theatrical style. TJ drives a ’59 pink Caddy convertible named Lulabell, and Di rides a 1968 “My Fair Lady” model banana-seat Stingray. TJ is the accolade-winning author of multiple works of New Orleans-based nonfiction and fiction. Award-winning designer Di is the proprietor of where the stars shop, Zogwald’s of the French Quarter, an ever popular and famed international boutique. (TJ also maintains a home in Palm Beach, Florida and Di in Melbourne, Australia.)

See outrageous Sandcastle Queen TJ Fisher and her idiosyncratic friend and partner in shenanigans Lady Marigny Di Harris in additional Tanzmanianmudbug YouTube postings: http://www.youtube.com/user/Tanzmanianmudbug.

See more about TJ at:

http://www.tjfisher.com

http://www.tjfisher.net

The vintage-style clip of Miss Marion (an afternoon in the life of TJ and Di, and their intriguingly surreal real world) ends with unforgettable imagery of Miss Marion in motion. Miss Marion regularly doles out her inspirational secrets of life and pearls of wisdom to, and is beloved by, an endless parade of superstars, luminaries, VIPs, ladies of society, the wealthy and the not-so-wealthy, common folks.

The duality of New Orleans and French Quarter life seems extreme. Here the unlikely happens frequently; ironic situations and chance meetings are an everyday occurrence. In New Orleans, history is not merely something observed from afar by leafing through the pages of textbooks. The rich cultural heritage of the city’s forebears still shapes, pervades and surrounds daily life. Here the band plays on, and life goes on. Joie de vivre.

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HBO and David Simon’s lush new drama series Treme “gets” New Orleans, they definitely get it, do you? Do you get the resilient heart, soul, spirit and humor of the people and places of New Orleans…?

DO YOU KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO MISS NEW ORLEANS?

Duration : 0:2:14

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What is the Name of this movie?

Name of movie i think it showed on lifetime it was really long like over 3 hours, 4 hrs name is a four letter female name it was a romantic drama that followed the life of title character from young woman to old woman. For some reason i’m thinking zola nola nora

Could it be this one?
Zoya (1995 TV miniseries)
aka Danielle Steel’s Zoya
starring Melissa Gilbert, Bruce Boxleitner, Denise Alexander, David Warner, Diana Rigg, Samuel (Sam) West
IMDb synopsis:
A young Russian countess escapes the 1917 revolution and, despite hardship, makes a new life for herself in America.
Here’s a film clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNfFQTPvZi0


The History Of Mardi Gras And How It Became A New Orleans Tradition

Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras

When you think of Mardi Gras people usually think of New Orleans Louisiana. This was not always true. So how did New Orleans become the home of the Greatest Free Show On Earth? Well let’s go way back to the beginning of Mardi Gras.

The Origins Of Mardi Gras

Even though Mardi Gras is perceived to have its roots in the Roman Catholic religion, it actually dates back to the days of ancient Rome. In the middle of the month of February, the Romans celebrated a holiday they called Lupercalia. The god Lupercus was the god of fertility, agriculture and pastoral shepherds and the festival was in his honor. Carnival which is considered synonymous with Mardi Gras is derived from the Latin expression meaning “farewell to the flesh”. This holiday was very similar to the Mardi Gras we know today. It had a festival almost circus atmosphere. There was also the festival of Saturnalia that seemed to have some effect on the origins of Mardi Gras. This holiday was also a time of jubilation that occurred around the end of December. The king was burned in effigy and was made to look ugly in appearance. This is where some of the traditions of masking seem to have been derived. Some of the colors of Mardi Gras, purple, green and gold may have come from this festival.

When Rome converted to Christianity, a common practice was to take pagan holidays and incorporate them into church holidays. Lupercalia was an example of that approach. So Lupercalia became Mardi Gras. This period was designed to be a last fling of partying, merriment and good times that came before the period of fasting, prayer and penance called Lent. During the Lenten period the faithful say good bye to the pleasures and indulgences of the flesh. This period lasts from Ash Wednesday until Easter Sunday or 40 days.

This tradition became a major holiday in the city of Paris during the Middle Ages when it spread across the continent of Europe. During medieval times lords held huge carnivals prior to Lent to honor the enrollment of new knights into the service of the local lord or baron. In France, this was a particularly raucous time.

Next how Mardi Gras made it to America.

The term “Fat Tuesday” or Mardi Gras referred to the indulgence that occurred.

Mardi Gras


New Orleans?

I want to visit Nola in a month for a anniversery and I want to make sure it’s up and running so it would be worth my time. Also, any attractions/restaurants that I should experience? Thanks

I was there in November and yes, it is up and running! The people is warm and nice, and the food is wonderful. I was there on a convention, so I did not have too much time to tour around, but the French Quarter is beautiful and it was not affected by the hurricane. Have fun and support Nola!


New Orleans Ladies

Music Video for New Orleans Ladies by Louisiana Leroux. yes this does include 2 clips from Finding Nemo as I was never around the Mississippi river by the time it was needed to be finished.

Also, the miniature pinscher that appears in the video at the point the song goes “sassy style that will drive you crazy” is named Sassy…so I thought she’d be a perfect fit for that part

Duration : 0:4:19

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