NOLA Life

Le Bonheur Pumpkin Run, Live at Nine, WREG, Memphis, TN, 10-06-2009, 9am

Jonathan and Desiree Bawcum, and their adorable two year old daughter, Nola, are interviewed on “Live at Nine”, on WREG in Memphis, Tennessee, with Alex Coleman and Marybeth Conley. Nola was born with hydrocephalus.

They were there to explain the importance of the Pumpkin Run for Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center.

Their team “Nola Gracyn”, raised the most money of all the teams for the Pumpkin Run. They did this in honor of the their daughter Nola, as well as for the hospital which saved their daughter’s life.

Duration : 0:5:58

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Life

Stop Animation

Shot and Edited by Wonmin Lee

December 16th, 2007

Duration : 1 min 10 sec

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New Orleans, LA – One Square Mile

The second episode from season two of One Square Mile explores the inhabitants of the Garden District and the Irish Channel neighborhoods of New Orleans, Louisiana. This documentary looks at the people of New Orleans, and the contemporary life of a post-Katrina city.

You can learn more about the people featured in this documentary, and view additional interviews from this and other square miles in the series by going to the series website www.onesquaremile.tv

Duration : 0:15:4

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Ray Rocks Renovation

Chances are if you have walked down any French Quarter street in the last few years you have seen my friend, Ray Hostetter.  He might have the phone to his ear or a tool of some kind in hand, but he always has a smile and a “Hey there” for passersby.  Now that may have been the extent of our association too, except for one thing (ok, two) I love construction, reconstruction, building, renovating, decorating. Whatever name you put on it, the creative process is fascinating to me.  Oh, and the second thing – I’m just nosy.

In my “ratting” around the Quarter, I had seen Ray at times working on a particularly beautiful place on the corner of Dauphine and Orleans. I could see the intensive work being done to the outside, but it was just killing me to know what they were doing to the inside. Come on, I know you know exactly what I’m talking about.  I saw the nose smudges on the windows. (Oops, sorry.  I guess those were mine.) Lo and behold, on this particular day a couple of years ago the door was wide open, so um, what to do, what to do?  Exactly, I went in.

Ray grew up in the construction business and was working in California until a series of events changed life as he knew it.  Work got scarce in big CA, Katrina hit New Orleans, a family member living in New Orleans said “Bring the wife and new baby over and work here”.  After doing a couple of flood houses in mid city and a 20 unit apartment complex Ray was introduced to the owner of the Orleans Avenue project, who we will call Mr. C.  It is interesting how one thing leads to another.  Mr. C. had rented a Bourbon Street balcony one Mardi Gras from Ray’s relative years ago and they became friends.

While into the Orleans Avenue project, Mr. C. decided to acquire the property at 435 Bourbon and turn it from a t-shirt shop into a bar. (Incidentally, this was the same place that he had rented all those Mardi Gras’ ago.) The whole bottom floor had to be taken out for the new electrical so while Ray was digging trenches between floor joices he made a discovery, an 1850 bottle of “Dr. J. Hostetter Stomach Bitters”.  This concoction of vitamins and herbs and 94% alcohol was sold to the Union army by train car from Pennsylvania during the first prohibition. Cool, huh? But it gets better. Did you notice that Dr. J and Ray share the same last name?  After doing a little research Ray found he and Dr. J were actually related.  That was when it all made sense for Ray, “I am in the right place doing what I am supposed to be doing.”

The Orleans Avenue project had discoveries of its’ own.  The first came when removing walls, Ray came upon the initials A.H. (another relative??) carved in a board with the date 1901.  Attached was a 1901 silver coin which today is worth $6,000.00.  These old French Quarter buildings are treasure troves and that is exactly what Ray thought when he uncovered the next surprise.  Extensive work was being done on the previously lathe and plastered walls.  Mr. C wanted the old brick walls exposed, cleaned and repointed.  In the process it was noticed that there was a definite brick archway visible just above floor level in the downstairs bedroom.

 At this point, you know a vision of Lafitte’s treasure was dancing in Ray’s head.  The old wood plank floors were pulled out and what looked like a tunnel opening was uncovered several feet under the existing floor.   Alas, the only thing inside was years upon years of mud and muck, no treasure.  But could it have been a bootleggers’ tunnel from Orleans Avenue to St. Peter and Dauphine, where for years the Tunnel Bar sat on the corner?  Research seems to lean more toward what was called a “cabinét”, something like a root cellar and not a tunnel at all.  Rather than cover up this historic piece of architecture, lightning and special glass flooring was installed to show it off.  It is breathtakingly beautiful, just like the rest of the three story structure and “slave quarters” included in this compound. 

Restoring this exquisite showplace to the splendor it deserves was a demanding, detailed project three years in the making and is today a phenomenal piece of workmanship.  A credit to a man who truly loves what he does. The mastery of his craft is so obvious in even the smallest detail. Bo might know sports, but Ray definitely knows renovation. You rock Ray!

 By Sharon Denise Talbot

*Stay tuned for more Renovation Reports with Ray.


NOLA New Year Gathering: Part 1

What a blast. I’m glad everyone that came was just as screwed up as us. Here’s footage from the first couple of days PRIOR to New Year’s Eve.

Please check our internet turned “In Real Life” friends in this video out:

www.youtube.com/speppers

www.youtube.com/nerdkiller

www.youtube.com/donkeyjune

Duration : 0:8:18

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A Day in a NOLA life Pt. 3

Part three of my fairly boring July 24th in New Orleans, LA filmed for the “Life in a Day” project. (Sorry about the darkness on this one. Dive bars in NOLA don’t ever have the lights turned all the way up.)

/ah

Duration : 0:1:50

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Switchfoot plays Bullet Soul @ New Orleans House of Blues- 11.21.2009

Switchfoot allowed a member of the audience (named Brandon) to come up and play Bullet Soul after they noticed a sign he was holding asking if he could do so. I’ve seen Switchfoot do this at other shows as well which is another reason that they’re probably my favorite band. These guys know the impact they make on a fan when they help them create this life long memory. Props to Switchfoot, what a great bunch of guys.

Duration : 0:3:51

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Walk of life

New Orleans

spiceworld tour 1998. New Orleans is filled with some “spicy women”. This is a video of the Spice Girls of the late 90′s. Kinda sounds a lot like life in New Orleans ;-)

New Orleans

Duration : 4 min 34 sec

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Acme Oyster House, Amazing Any Day!

During the Lenten season abstinence from meat on Fridays is obligatory for all us “good Catholics” in Louisiana and elsewhere. Salt and freshwater species of fish, amphibians, reptiles and shellfish are permitted.  So darn the luck, as Paw-Paw Benoit would say.  What do we in the Bayou State during Lent?  We eat even more seafood! 

 
If you are down in New Orleans during Lent (actually anytime of the year) and you are looking for seafood you have just hit the jackpot.  Some of the best seafood I have ever eaten was served up right here in the Crescent City.  The problem is choosing at which wonderful eatery to pull up a chair or a stool. Fans consistently rank Acme’s oysters, seafood and atmosphere among the best in New Orleans and the country and they get my vote, too.

Acme Oyster House has been around since1910. Louie Armstrong had not even started his first band and the Acme Café was opened on Royal Street in the French Quarter. Acme has long been a staple in the Big Easy restaurant pantry chock a block full of amazing cuisine.  Because a horrible fire in 1924 caused the collapse of the three-story Acme Saloon building, the Café was re-opened as Acme Oyster House around the corner at 724 Iberville in the world famous French Quarter, just off of Bourbon Street.  In addition to the French Quarter location, Acme Oyster Houses are open in Covington, Metairie, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and in Sandestin on the Florida panhandle.

Acme shucked well over 3.6 million fresh oysters in 2008. That’s almost 10,000 oysters a day and doesn’t even include the fried ones.   Its neon sign is a beacon guiding the hungry by the droves. Locals and tourists a-like line up for some of the best New Orleans style seafood around and is a testament to this place in a city renowned for its food. Don’t let the line deter you it moves really fast!  I suggest you order an Abita from the bar and hang tight.  Your seat at a checkered tablecloth covered table is coming right up.

World famous for their ice cold oysters on the half shell, Acme has out done themselves with their version of char-grilled oysters.  Grilled in the shell with garlic, butter and a sprinkling of parmesan cheese this is a treat for even the most oyster opposed of us.  Trust me; I have brought many an anti-oyster visitor over from the dark side by offering this sizzling delicacy on a piece of New Orleans French bread.  Just a side note, when the oyster is gone, dip your bread in the empty shell to get every drop of the buttery ambrosia left in the bottom!  Cést Bon, Cher!

If the oysters won’t tempt you then check out Acme’s impressive menu.  The fried catfish platter and the corn and crab soup may be just the thing for a Lenten supper.  Of course, there is always hot seafood gumbo to chase away the chill of a cool day.  No matter what you order you can’t go wrong. Stand in line at Acme. I promise, they aren’t going anywhere and it is well worth the wait!
 
By Sharon Denise Talbot


70′s Soul / Crossover ! Guitar Ray – You’re Gonna Wreck My Life

Old fave of mine……….

Duration : 0:3:10

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