Bourbon Street

Street Dares

A bloke in a checked shirt takes to the streets and asks passers-by to do various things for him, including singing offensive songs at girls; chanting Oh-lay, oh-lay oh-lay oh-lay; playing with a shopping trolley and a traffic cone; in the street; pouring sick over themselves and in their hair; fighting, etc. The presenter is John Luke Roberts.

Duration : 1 min 21 sec

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Episode 21 – Exploring Bourbon Country Part 2

In this episode we continue our Bourbon Country adventure and explore the eastern Bluegrass region of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. We visit Four Roses, Woodford Reserve, Buffalo Trace and Wild Turkey distilleries. Lodging and dining at the Beaumont Inn.

Click here to visit Go To Louisville Web site

Duration : 9 min 57 sec

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Desbundixie – Bourbon Street Parade

Desbundixie in Aljustrel Jazz Festival
www.desbundixie.com

Duration : 0:3:58

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What clubs on Bourbon Street in New Orleans allow 18 year olds to party?

I am planning on going for my 18th birthday and I was just wondering if I could get into a few clubs. :) I am planning on staying at a hotel on Bourbon Street and everything, but I don’t want to go if I can’t party. I know you have to be 21 to drink though…

I live in New orleans and have been going to the clubs before I was 17 most of the clubs on bourbon or in new orleans dont ask for ID as long as you look legal your in. your gonna have fun on bourbon anyway you may not even wanna go into a club


Mardi Gras 2008: Bourbon Street

Mardi Gras 2008: Bourbon Street

Duration : 0:1:28

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Hotlanta Dixieland Jazz – Bourbon Street Parade

Hotlanta Dixieland Jazz – Bourbon Street Parade
“Jazz with a Southern Accent)
www.RussianFolk.com

Duration : 0:3:50

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DSCB & Mrs. Einstein – Bourbon Street Parade

Dutch Swing College Band & Mrs. Einstein – Bourbon Street Parade

Burghausen (Germany), 2007 March 17

A popular saying goes: “There are two kinds of music, good music and bad music”. For the true fan of good traditional jazz music the choice is simple, because there is only one Dutch Swing College Band. The Dutch Swing College Band started out as an amateur-college combo on liberation day (1945, may 5th) and through the years it has grown into a worldfamous jazz ensemble that has toured all five continents to much acclaim. The DSC played a prominent role during the post-war period. At the time many youngsters fell under the spell of the original Amerian music: jazz. The band, which has existed for more than sixty years, has given concerts all over the world and the sounds have been registered on practically all types of sound recordings since 1945. The band also appeared frequently on TV and in film productions. Through the years many big names in jazz music were backed by the DSC, from Sidney Bechet, Joe Venuti and Rita Reys to Teddy Wilson. The expression “The Haque School” was born out of the big influence of the DSC on the Dutch jazz scene. Deservedly many jazz fans consider the DSC almost as an institution. Fortunately, the Dutch Swing College Band has never presented itself as a show or glitter orchestra. The musicians have always succeeded in capturing the public’s attention with their excellent jazz performances. Cheap show tricks were absolutely out of the question. In 1960, the DSC turned professional. Throughout the music’s evolution and in spite of quite a number af personnel changes (and contary to many imitators) the DSC remained the showpiece of Dutch traditional jazz music. Bob Kaper heads the current line-up, in succession to Frans Vink Jr (1945-’46), Joop Schrier (1955-’60) and Peter Schilperoort (1946-’55 and 1960-’90). From the very beginning the most striking characteristic of the band has always been its unique and recognizable sound. In other words, no recordings of American virtuosos were ever copied: the DSC created their own interpretations, arrangements or compositions. An entirely personal approach. The current line-up of the highly experienced band has proved that the old name Dutch Swing College Band still guarantees professional performances of traditional jazz music of international standard!

Duration : 0:2:19

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Treme: Beyond Bourbon Street (HBO)

Explore the diverse cultures, traditions, music and food of New Orleans in this in-depth look at the new HBO drama series “Treme.” For more information, log onto HBO.com.

Duration : 0:29:7

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Ray Rocks Renovation

Chances are if you have walked down any French Quarter street in the last few years you have seen my friend, Ray Hostetter.  He might have the phone to his ear or a tool of some kind in hand, but he always has a smile and a “Hey there” for passersby.  Now that may have been the extent of our association too, except for one thing (ok, two) I love construction, reconstruction, building, renovating, decorating. Whatever name you put on it, the creative process is fascinating to me.  Oh, and the second thing – I’m just nosy.

In my “ratting” around the Quarter, I had seen Ray at times working on a particularly beautiful place on the corner of Dauphine and Orleans. I could see the intensive work being done to the outside, but it was just killing me to know what they were doing to the inside. Come on, I know you know exactly what I’m talking about.  I saw the nose smudges on the windows. (Oops, sorry.  I guess those were mine.) Lo and behold, on this particular day a couple of years ago the door was wide open, so um, what to do, what to do?  Exactly, I went in.

Ray grew up in the construction business and was working in California until a series of events changed life as he knew it.  Work got scarce in big CA, Katrina hit New Orleans, a family member living in New Orleans said “Bring the wife and new baby over and work here”.  After doing a couple of flood houses in mid city and a 20 unit apartment complex Ray was introduced to the owner of the Orleans Avenue project, who we will call Mr. C.  It is interesting how one thing leads to another.  Mr. C. had rented a Bourbon Street balcony one Mardi Gras from Ray’s relative years ago and they became friends.

While into the Orleans Avenue project, Mr. C. decided to acquire the property at 435 Bourbon and turn it from a t-shirt shop into a bar. (Incidentally, this was the same place that he had rented all those Mardi Gras’ ago.) The whole bottom floor had to be taken out for the new electrical so while Ray was digging trenches between floor joices he made a discovery, an 1850 bottle of “Dr. J. Hostetter Stomach Bitters”.  This concoction of vitamins and herbs and 94% alcohol was sold to the Union army by train car from Pennsylvania during the first prohibition. Cool, huh? But it gets better. Did you notice that Dr. J and Ray share the same last name?  After doing a little research Ray found he and Dr. J were actually related.  That was when it all made sense for Ray, “I am in the right place doing what I am supposed to be doing.”

The Orleans Avenue project had discoveries of its’ own.  The first came when removing walls, Ray came upon the initials A.H. (another relative??) carved in a board with the date 1901.  Attached was a 1901 silver coin which today is worth $6,000.00.  These old French Quarter buildings are treasure troves and that is exactly what Ray thought when he uncovered the next surprise.  Extensive work was being done on the previously lathe and plastered walls.  Mr. C wanted the old brick walls exposed, cleaned and repointed.  In the process it was noticed that there was a definite brick archway visible just above floor level in the downstairs bedroom.

 At this point, you know a vision of Lafitte’s treasure was dancing in Ray’s head.  The old wood plank floors were pulled out and what looked like a tunnel opening was uncovered several feet under the existing floor.   Alas, the only thing inside was years upon years of mud and muck, no treasure.  But could it have been a bootleggers’ tunnel from Orleans Avenue to St. Peter and Dauphine, where for years the Tunnel Bar sat on the corner?  Research seems to lean more toward what was called a “cabinét”, something like a root cellar and not a tunnel at all.  Rather than cover up this historic piece of architecture, lightning and special glass flooring was installed to show it off.  It is breathtakingly beautiful, just like the rest of the three story structure and “slave quarters” included in this compound. 

Restoring this exquisite showplace to the splendor it deserves was a demanding, detailed project three years in the making and is today a phenomenal piece of workmanship.  A credit to a man who truly loves what he does. The mastery of his craft is so obvious in even the smallest detail. Bo might know sports, but Ray definitely knows renovation. You rock Ray!

 By Sharon Denise Talbot

*Stay tuned for more Renovation Reports with Ray.


Carry a pocket knife on bourbon street?

Could I carry a decent sized pocket knife while walking up and down bourbon street? Going into bars and shops? Laws down there? Never been there before.

as long as the blade is not longer than 4 inches it’s not a problem.

but wearing it say on your belt, in a holder is not recommended as the policemen/bouncers may ask you to leave it at home or in your car.

so carry it if you want but keep it in your pocket or out of sight.


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